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Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (a/k/a the ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge Driver), for Windows
<ol> <li>You must have a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources.</li> <ul> <li>Generally, the latest JVM from <a href="http://java.com/">http://java.com/</a> is the best choice.</li> <li>If using a 64-bit ODBC Driver, you must have a 64-bit JVM.</li> </ul> <li>You must possess third-party or native JDBC drivers that connect to your target database.</li> <li>If your 3rd party JDBC Driver connection attempt isn't successful, check that the JDBC driver jar file (or a symbolic link to it) is included in the active <code>$CLASSPATH</code>.</li> <li><strong>Note:</strong> Supporting Java libraries (or links to them) may also need to be referenced by this variable value.</li> <li>Finally, directories containing other supporting libraries may need to be referenced by other shared library environment variables (e.g., <code>LD_LIBRARY_PATH</code>, <code>LIBPATH</code>, <code>SHLIB_PATH</code>).</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteJDBCInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (the ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge), for Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (the ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge), for Windows
<ol> <li> Download and open the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (also known as the ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge) is distributed in a single <code>.msi</code> file. <ul> <li> <code>Download</code> and <code>double click</code> on the downloaded <code>.msi</code>. </li> </ul> </li> <li> Your driver needs a license file to operate. <ul> <li> Click the <strong>Browse</strong> button to locate a commercial or evaluation license that you have previously downloaded onto your local hard drive. </li> <li> Alternatively, click the <strong>Try & Buy</strong> button to obtain a commercial or evaluation license. </li> <li> <strong>64-Bit</strong> licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>. </li> <li> <strong>32-Bit</strong> licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>. </li> </ul> </li> <li> Proceed to configuring an ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) that binds to your target JDBC database. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteJDBCDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of ODBC Data Source Names associated with the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge) for Windows</a></p>
Configuration of ODBC Data Source Names associated with the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge) for Windows
<ol> <li>Determine that you have a working JDBC connection to your target database.</li> <li>Also determine the bitness (32-bit or 64-bit) of the driver used as this <strong>MUST</strong> match the Java Virtual Machine and ODBC-JDBC Bridge Driver bitness.</li> <li>Launch the ODBC Data Sources Application and click the System DSN tab.</li> <li>Click the Add button.</li> <li>Select the OpenLink "Lite" Driver for JDBC Data Sources from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> <li>Click Finish.</li> <li>The first dialog prompts for a Data Source Name and optional description. Click Next.</li> <li>The second dialog prompts for a third-party JDBC driver name, JDBC connection URL, and authentication parameters associated with that JDBC URL. <ul> <li><strong>JDBC driver:</strong> This is the class name of the target JDBC driver.</li> <li><strong>URL string:</strong> This is the JDBC connection URL for the target JDBC driver.</li> <li><strong>Connect now to verify that all settings are correct:</strong> Will attempt to connect to the database, once you click Continue.</li> <li><strong>Login ID:</strong> This is a valid username for your JDBC database.</li> <li><strong>Password:</strong> This is a valid password for your JDBC database.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> <li>The third dialog takes a combination of database-specific and optional parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Drop Catalog name from DatabaseMetaData calls:</strong> Enable this option to have the catalog name not appear for tables, views, and procedures when requesting database meta-data.</li> <li><strong>Drop Schema name from DatabaseMetaData calls:</strong> Enable this option to have the schema name not appear for tables, views, and procedures when requesting database meta-data.</li> <li><strong>Return an empty ResultSet for SQLStatistics:</strong> Check this box to have SQLStatistics() return an empty resultset. Use this if the underlying database does not support retrieval of statistics about a table (e.g., what indexes it has).</li> <li><strong>Disable support of quoted identifier:</strong> If set, the call SQLGetInfo(SQL_IDENTIFIER_QUOTE_CHAR) will return a space (""). It can be used if the DBMS doesn't support quoted SQL like SELECT * FROM "account".</li> <li><strong>Disable support of search pattern escape:</strong> If set, the call SQLGetInfo(SQL_LIKE_ESCAPE_CLAUSE) will return a space (""). It can be used if the DBMS doesn't support SQL escape patterns.</li> <li><strong>Enable logging of JDBC calls to the log file:</strong> Check this option to enable logging of JDBC calls to a log file.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> <li>The fourth dialog enables you to set optional ODBC connection parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Read-only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Must be unchecked to INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE records and to run some Stored Procedures, including some built-in functions.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) fields in wildcard queries. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC-compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> This attribute specifies the number of records to be delivered from the driver to the client application in a single batch. Values can range from 1 to 999.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override:</strong> Allows you to set a limit for the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Initial SQL:</strong> Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Dynamic Cursor Sensitivity:</strong> Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors.</li> <li><strong>Enable logging to the log file:</strong> Check the checkbox and use the associated textbox to provide the full path to a file in which to log diagnostic information.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> <li>The fifth dialog enables you to set additional parameters to enhance compatibility with applications. <ul> <li><strong>Enable Microsoft Jet engine options:</strong> Facilitates translation of certain data types for the Microsoft Jet Engine. If you notice that money and other datatypes are mishandled with Microsoft or other applications, test with Jet fix enabled.</li> <li><strong>Disable Autocommit:</strong> Changes the commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit:</strong> Disables a limitation enforced by the cursor library. This limitation is enforced by default. It prevents the driver from claiming all available memory when a resultset (typically generated by an accidental query) is very large. The limit is not normally reached.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation:</strong> Enables the use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this by emulation within the driver.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the value should be "SQL Server".</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> <li>The final dialog enables you to test your Data Source. Click the Test Data Source button.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (a/k/a ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge), for macOS
<ol> <li>Download the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources disk image (.dmg) file.</li> <li>Double-click the disk image file to open it.</li> <li>Run the installer <code>.mpkg</code> file to start the installation process.</li> <li>After the driver is installed, you will be prompted to locate a license file.</li> <li><strong>NOTE:</strong> If a correctly named file already exists in <code>$OPL_LICENSE_DIR</code>, <code>/Library/Application Support/OpenLink/Licenses/</code>, you will not see this dialog. If the existing file is not valid (evaluation has expired, it's for a different OS, it permits insufficient processor cores, etc.), you will need to manually apply a valid license file after installation is completed.</li> <li><strong>NOTE:</strong> In some environments, this dialog may be hidden by the <code>Installer.app</code> or other windows on your Mac. Please minimize, hide, and/or move windows until you can see and act on this dialog. If you do not answer this dialog, the installation will not complete properly, and the driver will not function as desired.</li> <li>If a license file already exists on the machine, select the 'use existing' option. (Previously generated license files may be re-downloaded from your ODS-Briefcase data space.)</li> <li>If you need to obtain a new trial or permanent license file, select the 'try or buy' option, which will load a relevant web page from which you can obtain a license file.</li> <li>Click Next and continue through the dialog until Installation is complete.</li> <li>Click the Finish button.</li> </ol> To configure an ODBC DSN, follow these steps: <ol> <li>Run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the <code>/Applications/iODBC</code> folder.</li> <li>Click the System DSN tab.</li> <li>Click the Add button.</li> <li>Select the OpenLink JDBC Lite Driver from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> <li>Click Finish.</li> </ol> The Data Source tab prompts for a <strong>Data Source Name</strong> and an optional <strong>description</strong>. The Connection Tab requires the following minimum requirements to connect to your JDBC data source: <ul> <li><strong>JDBC Driver</strong> - The class name for your third-party JDBC driver, e.g., <code>virtuoso.jdbc3.Driver</code></li> <li><strong>URL String</strong> - The JDBC connection URL for your third-party JDBC driver</li> <li><strong>Username</strong> - The username for your JDBC database</li> </ul> The Options tab displays additional parameters that can be configured for the connection, such as: <ul> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> - The number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>Hide Login Dialog</strong> - Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Read Only connection</strong> - Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>Drop Catalog from Meta calls</strong> - Enable this option to have the catalog name not appear for tables, views, and procedures when requesting database meta-data.</li> <li><strong>Drop Schema from Meta calls</strong> - Enable this option to have the schema name not appear for tables, views, and procedures when requesting database meta-data.</li> <li><strong>No support of quoted identifier</strong> - If set, the call SQLGetInfo for 'SQL_IDENTIFIER_QUOTE_CHAR' will return a space (" "). It can be used if the DBMS doesn't support quoted SQL like SELECT * from "account".</li> <li><strong>SQLStatistics disabled</strong> - Check this box to have SQLStatistics() return an empty result set. Use this if the underlying database does not support retrieval of statistics about a table (e.g., what indexes it has).</li> <li><strong>No support of search string escape</strong> - If set, the call SQLGetInfo(SQL_LIKE_ESCAPE_CLAUSE) will return a space (" "). It can be used if the DBMS doesn't support SQL escape patterns.</li> <li><strong>Patch of NULL size of SQL_CHAR</strong> - If set, this option overrides the size of SQL_CHAR column type returned by the database with the value set in the text box (in bytes). With a default value of 0, the driver uses the size returned by the database.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name</strong> - Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath (for which the value should be "SQL Server").</li> <li><strong>Initialization SQL</strong> - Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Cursor Sensitivity</strong> - Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously. If the checksums differ for a row, the row has been updated since it was last fetched and the row status flag is set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED. The row version cache is then updated with the latest checksums for the rowset. From the user's point of view, the only visible difference between the two sensitivity settings is that a row status flag can never be set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED when the cursor sensitivity is low. (The row status is instead displayed as SQL_ROW_SUCCESS.) In all other respects, performance aside, the two settings are the same. Deleted rows don't appear in the rowset. Updates to the row since the row was last fetched are reflected in the row data, and inserted rows appear in the rowset if their keys fall within the span of the rowset. If your application does not need to detect the row status SQL_ROW_UPDATED, you should leave the 'High Cursor Sensitivity' checkbox unchecked, as performance is improved. The calculation and comparison of checksums for each row fetched carries an overhead. Before enabling this option, the table oplrvc must be created using the appropriate script for the target database.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override</strong> - Allows you to define a limit on the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Disable AutoCommit</strong> - Changes the default commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable Rowset Size Limit</strong> - Disables a limitation enforced by the cursor library. This limitation is enforced by default. It prevents the driver from claiming all available memory in the event that a result set generated from an erroneous query is very large. The limit is not normally reached.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> - Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This can provide significant performance increases when fields in a query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation</strong> - Enables the use of Multiple Active Statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, as it is emulated in the driver.</li> <li>Click the Finish button to save your new Data Source Name.</li> </ul>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteJDBCDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Data Source Name Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (a/k/a ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge), for macOS </a></p>
Data Source Name Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (a/k/a ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge), for macOS
<ol> <li>To configure an ODBC DSN, run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the <code>/Applications/iODBC</code> folder:</li> <li>Click the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab, and then click the <strong>Add</strong> button.</li> <li>Select the <strong>OpenLink JDBC Lite Driver</strong> from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> <li>Click <strong>Finish</strong>.</li> <li>The <strong>Data Source</strong> tab prompts a Data Source Name and optional description. <ul> <li><strong>DSN:</strong> A brief and meaningful title for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Description:</strong> An optional description for your Data Source Name</li> </ul> </li> <li>The <strong>Connection</strong> Tab takes the minimum requirements that are necessary to connect to your JDBC data source. <ul> <li><strong>JDBC Driver:</strong> The class name for your third-party JDBC driver, e.g., <code>virtuoso.jdbc3.Driver</code></li> <li><strong>URL String:</strong> The JDBC connection URL for your third-party JDBC driver</li> <li><strong>Username:</strong> The username for your JDBC database</li> </ul> </li> <li>The <strong>Options</strong> tab displays additional parameters that can be configured for the connection. <ul> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> The number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>Hide Login Dialog:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Read Only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>Drop Catalog from Meta calls:</strong> Enable this option to have the catalog name not appear for tables, views, and procedures when requesting database meta-data.</li> <li><strong>Drop Schema from Meta calls:</strong> Enable this option to have the schema name not appear for tables, views, and procedures when requesting database meta-data.</li> <li><strong>No support of quoted identifier:</strong> If set, the call SQLGetInfo for 'SQL_IDENTIFIER_QUOTE_CHAR' will return a space ("" ""). It can be used if the DBMS doesn't support quoted SQL like SELECT * from ""account"".</li> <li><strong>SQLStatistics disabled:</strong> Check this box to have SQLStatistics() return an empty result set. Use this if the underlying database does not support retrieval of statistics about a table (e.g. what indexes it has).</li> <li><strong>No support of search string escape:</strong> If set, the call SQLGetInfo(SQL_LIKE_ESCAPE_CLAUSE) will return a space ("" ""). It can be used if the DBMS doesn't support SQL escape patterns.</li> <li><strong>Patch of NULL size of SQL_CHAR:</strong> If set, this option overrides the size of SQL_CHAR column type returned by the database withthe value set in the text box (in bytes). With a default value of 0, the driver uses the size returned by the database.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath (for which the value should be "SQL Server").</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to view additional preferences that can be set for the connection. <ul> <li><strong>Initialization SQL:</strong> Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Cursor Sensitivity:</strong> Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously. If the checksums differ for a row, the row has been updated since it was last fetched and the row status flag is set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED. The row version cache is then updated with the latest checksums for the rowset. From the user's point of view, the only visible difference between the two sensitivity settings is that a row status flag can never be set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED when the cursor sensitivity is low. (The row status is instead displayed as SQL_ROW_SUCCESS.) In all other respects, performance aside, the two settings are the same. Deleted rows don't appear in the rowset. Updates to the row since the row was last fetched are reflected in the row data, and inserted rows appear in the rowset, if their keys fall within the span of the rowset. If your application does not need to detect the row status SQL_ROW_UPDATED, you should leave the 'High Cursor Sensitivity' checkbox unchecked, as performance is improved. The calculation and comparison of checksums for each row fetched carries an overhead. If this option is enabled, the table oplrvc must have been created beforehand using the appropriate script for the target database.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override:</strong> Allows you to define a limit on the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Show remarks:</strong> Affects output from the SQLColumns() ODBC API call. Use this option in conjunction with Oracle queries. When enabled, the REMARKS column of a SQLColumns() result set includes the comments from the COMMENTS column of the Oracle ALL_COL_COMMENTS data dictionary view. When disabled, the REMARKS column is empty. Disabling Show Remarks improves performance.</li> <li><strong>Disable autocommit:</strong> Changes the default commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit:</strong> Removes OpenLink's default 100 rowset restriction.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Always include VIEWS in table list:</strong></li> <li><strong>Always include all types in table list:</strong></li> <li><strong>Custom Catalogue Views:</strong> Dictates whether custom OpenLink views are used toreturn metadata for certain ODBC catalog functions: SQLForeignKeys(), SQLPrimaryKeys(), SQLProcedureColumns(), SQLProcedures(), and SQLSpecialColumns(). These custom views provide more metadata than is normally provided by the standard Oracle data dictionary views.</li> <li><strong>User's own tables first in SQLTables:</strong> This option is specific to OpenLink's Oracle drivers. It prompts the SQLTables() ODBC API call to display the connected user's tables first in table lists. The default ordering is alphabetical.</li> <li><strong>Count stored procedure parameters in SQL Procedures:</strong> This parameter is specific to the Oracle data source. It affects the output from SQLProcedures() when "Custom Catalog Views" is enabled.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click the <strong>Finish</strong> button to save your new Data Source Name.</li> <li>Click the <strong>Finish</strong> button to save your new Data Source Name.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXSampleAppUsageiODBCDemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (a/k/a the ODBC-JDBC Bridge), Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You must have a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources.</li> <ul> <li>Generally, the latest JVM from <a href="http://java.com/">http://java.com/</a> is the best choice.</li> <li>If using a 64-bit ODBC Driver, you must have a 64-bit JVM.</li> </ul> <li>You must possess third-party or native JDBC drivers that connect to your target database.</li> <li>If your 3rd party JDBC Driver connection attempt isn't successful, check that the JDBC driver jar file (or a symbolic link to it) is included in the active <code>$CLASSPATH</code>.</li> <ul> <li>Note, supporting Java libraries (or links to them) may also need to be referenced by this variable value.</li> <li>Finally, directories containing other supporting libraries may need to be referenced by other shared library environment variables (e.g., <code>LD_LIBRARY_PATH</code>, <code>LIBPATH</code>, <code>SHLIB_PATH</code>).</li> </ul> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxLiteODBCDriverInstallerInstallationGuide#this'>OpenLink ODBC Driver Installation for Linux </a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Unix/Linux
<ol> <li> Prerequisites: <ul> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix shell.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix editor such as vi.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be in possession of relevant database connectivity details such as Database name, Username, password, etc.</li> </ul> </li> <li> Open the file <code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi. </li> <li> Locate and edit the sample OpenLink ODBC To JDBC Bridge data source (DSN) created during the installation process and edit as follows: <pre> [jdbc] Driver = &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/lib/jdbc90_mt_lt.so UserName = &lt;Username&gt; JdbcDriver = &lt;JDBC Driver Class&gt; URLString = jdbc:openlink://&lt;Connection URL&gt; </pre> </li> <li> Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows: <pre> # cd &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt; # . ./openLink.sh # iodbctest jdbc </pre> <blockquote> iODBC Demonstration program<br> This program shows an interactive SQL processor<br> Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105<br> Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so)<br> <br> SQL&gt; </blockquote> </li> <li> You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </li> </ol> <p> Additional Information:<br> The bitness of the ODBC Driver for MySQL is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.<br> That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit. </p>
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Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for MySQL, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target MySQL instance and database:</li> <ul> <li><strong>MySQL TCP port:</strong> The port number on which the MySQL instance is listening.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of the MySQL database server:</strong> The hostname or IP address of the server where the MySQL database server is running.</li> </ul> <li>You need to know whether the client application is 32-bit or 64-bit. The Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for MySQL must match the bit format of the client application.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteMySQLInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Sources, for Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Sources, for Windows
<ol> <li> Download and double click on the downloaded Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Sources, which is distributed in a single <code>.msi</code> file. </li> <li> Your driver needs a license file to operate. <ul> <li> Click the Browse button to locate a commercial or evaluation license that you have previously downloaded onto your local hard drive. Alternatively, click the Try & Buy button to obtain a commercial or evaluation license. </li> <li> <strong>NOTE</strong> - 64-Bit licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>, while 32-Bit licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>. </li> </ul> </li> <li> Proceed to configuring an ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) that binds to your target MySQL database. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteMySQLDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Source Configuration (Windows)</a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Source Configuration (Windows)
<ol> <li>Open the "ODBC Data Sources" Application.</li> <li>64-bit drivers should be configured with the 64-bit Application.</li> <li>32-bit drivers should be configured with the 32-bit Application.</li> <li>Select the System DSN tab, then click Add.</li> <li>Select the OpenLink "Lite" Driver for MySQL Data Sources from the list of available drivers. Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> <li>Click Finish.</li> <li>The first dialog prompts for a Data Source Name and optional description.</li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The second dialog prompts for information that identifies the MySQL database server and listen port. It also provides a checkbox that allows you to check your basic connection parameters before setting advanced and optional settings:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Host</strong> - The hostname or IP address of the server on which MySQL runs</li> <li><strong>Port</strong> - The TCP port on which MySQL listens</li> <li><strong>Database</strong> - The MySQL database</li> <li><strong>Login ID</strong> - A MySQL username</li> <li><strong>Connect now to verify that all settings are correct</strong> - Will attempt to connect to the database, once you click Continue.</li> <li><strong>Password</strong> - A valid MySQL database password</li> </ul> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The third dialog enables you to set MySQL specific parameters:</li> <ul> <li><strong>No transactions</strong> - Disable ODBC transaction management. All transactions will be automatically committed. This prevents palloc() failures with out-of-memory errors when doing really big transactions, such as exporting 10,000 records from Microsoft Access.</li> <li><strong>Catalogs return Owner</strong> - Check this box so that ODBC API catalog calls return values in catalog columns as the database owner or schema.</li> <li><strong>Use Cursor Fetch</strong> - This parameter, specific to MySQL 5, enables the use of internal cursors to fetch result sets.</li> <li><strong>Prepare Method</strong> - Enables you to specify the Prepare/Execute Method. More</li> <li><strong>Character set</strong> - Allows you to choose the client character set. (ANSI only)</li> </ul> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The fourth dialog enables you to set optional ODBC connection parameters:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Read-only connection</strong> — Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Must be unchecked to INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE records, and to run some Stored Procedures including some built-in functions.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> — Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) fields in wildcard queries. This provides significant performance increases when fields in query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login</strong> — Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> — This attribute specifies the number of records to be delivered from the driver to the client application in a single batch. Values can range from 1 to 999.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override</strong> — Allows you to set a limit for the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Initial SQL</strong> — Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Dynamic Cursor Sensitivity</strong> — Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors.</li> <li><strong>Enable logging to the log file</strong> — Check the checkbox and use the associated textbox to provide the full path to a file in which to log diagnostic information.</li> </ul> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The fifth dialog enables you to set additional parameters to enhance compatibility with applications:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Enable Microsoft Jet engine options</strong> — Facilitates translation of certain data types for the Microsoft Jet Engine. If you notice that money and other datatypes are mishandled with Microsoft or other applications, test with Jet fix enabled.</li> <li><strong>Disable Autocommit</strong> — Changes the commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit</strong> — Disables a limitation enforced by the cursor library. This limitation is enforced by default. It prevents the driver from claiming all available memory when a resultset is very large.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation</strong> — Enables use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, by emulation within the driver.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name</strong> — Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver.</li> </ul> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The final dialog enables you to test your Data Source. Click the Test Data Source button.</li> <li>Once a successful connection has been established, click Finish.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for MySQL, for macOS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your MySQL Server:</li> <ul> <li><strong>MySQL TCP port:</strong> The port number on which the MySQL Server is listening.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of the MySQL database server:</strong> The hostname or IP address of the server where the MySQL database server is running.</li> </ul> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteMySQLInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Sources, for macOS</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li> Download and open the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Sources, which is distributed in a single disk image (<code>.dmg</code>) file, containing a Macintosh Installer package (<code>.mpkg</code>). <ul> <li> Double-click the <code>.mpkg</code> to start the installation process. </li> </ul> </li> <li> After the driver has been installed, you will be prompted to locate a license file. <ul> <li> <strong>NOTE</strong> - If a correctly named file already exists in <code>$OPL_LICENSE_DIR</code>, <code>/Library/Application Support/OpenLink/Licenses/</code>, you will not see this dialog. If the existing file is not valid (evaluation has expired, it's for a different OS, it permits insufficient processor cores, etc.), you will need to manually apply a valid license file after installation is completed. </li> <li> <strong>NOTE</strong> - In some environments, this dialog may be hidden by the Installer.app or other windows on your Mac. Please minimize, hide, and/or move windows until you can see and act on this dialog. If you do not answer this dialog, the installation will not complete properly, and the driver will not function as desired. </li> <li> If a license file already exists on the machine, select the '<strong>use existing</strong>' option. (Previously generated license files may be re-downloaded from your ODS-Briefcase data space.) </li> <li> If you need to obtain a new trial or permanent license file, select the '<strong>try or buy</strong>' option, which will load a relevant web page from which you can obtain a license file. </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteMySQLDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for macOS</a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for MySQL Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for macOS
<ol> <li> To configure an ODBC DSN, run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the <code>/Applications/iODBC</code> folder. <ul> <li>Click the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab.</li> <li>Click the <strong>Add</strong> button.</li> </ul> </li> <li> Select the OpenLink MySQL Lite Driver from the list of available drivers. Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance. <ul> <li>Click <strong>Finish</strong>.</li> </ul> </li> <li> The Data Source tab prompts for information that identifies the MySQL database server and listen port. It also requests a name for your Data Source. You may also supply an optional description for your Data Source Name. <ul> <li><strong>DSN:</strong> A brief and meaningful title for your Data Source Name.</li> <li><strong>Description:</strong> An optional description for your Data Source Name.</li> <li><strong>Host:</strong> The hostname or IP of the server on which MySQL runs.</li> <li><strong>Port:</strong> The TCP port on which MySQL listens.</li> <li>Click <strong>"Continue"</strong> to proceed to the next step.</li> </ul> </li> <li> The Connection Tab takes a combination of required and optional parameters to make a connection to the target database. <ul> <li><strong>Username:</strong> A MySQL username.</li> <li><strong>Choose a database with this data source:</strong> Check to override the default database associated with the DBMS.</li> <li><strong>Password:</strong> A valid MySQL password.</li> <li><strong>Database:</strong> A valid MySQL database. Note: A valid username and password must be input above before this menu can be used.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to view options that can be set for the connection:</li> </ul> </li> <li> Additional connection options: <ul> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> This attribute specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>Hide Login Dialog:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Read Only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>No transactions:</strong> Disable ODBC transaction management. All transactions will be automatically committed. This prevents palloc() failures with out-of-memory errors when doing really big transactions such as exporting 10000 records from MS/Access.</li> <li><strong>Reconnect on Cancel:</strong></li> <li><strong>Prepare Method:</strong> This option can take the values None, Partial, Full (connectoptions -O [0, 1, 2] respectively). It is used to determine whether stored procedures are created on the server for calls to SQLPrepare.</li> <li><strong>Character set:</strong></li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the value should be "SQL Server."</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to view additional preferences that can be set for the connection:</li> </ul> </li> <li> Additional preferences: <ul> <li><strong>Initialization SQL:</strong> Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Cursor Sensitivity:</strong> Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously. If the checksums differ for a row, the row has been updated since it was last fetched and the row status flag is set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED. The row version cache is then updated with the latest checksums for the rowset. From the user's point of view, the only visible difference between the two sensitivity settings is that a row status flag can never be set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED when the cursor sensitivity is low. (The row status is instead displayed as SQL_ROW_SUCCESS.) In all other respects, performance aside, the two settings are the same. Deleted rows don't appear in the rowset. Updates to the row since the row was last fetched are reflected in the row data, and inserted rows appear in the rowset if their keys fall within the span of the rowset. If your application does not need to detect the row status SQL_ROW_UPDATED, you should leave the 'High Cursor Sensitivity' checkbox unchecked, as performance is improved. The calculation and comparison of checksums for each row fetched carries an overhead. If this option is enabled, the table oplrvc must have been created beforehand using the appropriate script for the target database.</li> <li><strong>MaxRows Override:</strong> Allows you to define a limit on the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Disable AutoCommit:</strong> Changes the default commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This provides significant performance increases when fields in a query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Catalogs return Owner:</strong> Check this box so that ODBC API catalog calls return values in catalog columns as the database owner or schema.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation:</strong> Enables the use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, as it is emulated in the driver.</li> <li><strong>Always include VIEWS in table list:</strong> This switch is needed for Microsoft Excel and Query, Stata, and some other tools which explicitly request only TABLEs from the back-end DBMS. Tick this box if you also need to see VIEWS in the graphical query builder. This option is redundant when Always include all types is ticked.</li> <li><strong>Always include all types in table list:</strong> This switch is needed for Microsoft Excel and Query, Stata, and some other tools which explicitly requestonly TABLEs from the back-end DBMS. Tick this box if you also need to see SYSTEM TABLEs, VIEWs, SYSTEM VIEWs, SYNONYMs, GLOBAL TEMPORARYs, ALIASes, and/or LOCAL TEMPORARYs in the graphical query builder. Note: the TABLE list will be much longer than when this box is not ticked, and SYSTEM objects will be sorted to the top of the list, due to typical naming conventions.</li> </ul> </li> <li> When finished, click the <strong>Finish</strong> button to save your new Data Source Name. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXSampleAppUsageiODBCDemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for MySQL, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your MySQL Server:</li> <ul> <li><strong>MySQL TCP port:</strong> The port number on which the MySQL Server is listening.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of the MySQL database server:</strong> The hostname or IP address of the server where the MySQL database server is running.</li> </ul> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxLiteODBCDriverInstallerInstallationGuide#this'>OpenLink ODBC Driver Installation for Linux </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (a/k/a JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for Windows
<ol> <li>You must have a working ODBC Environment (comprising an ODBC Administrator and Driver Manager) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) JDBC to ODBC Bridge Driver for ODBC Data Sources.</li> <li>You must be able to establish an ODBC connection to one or more target databases using third-party or native ODBC drivers that have already been installed.</li> <li>You must have a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources. <ul> <li>Generally, the latest JVM from <a href="http://java.com/">http://java.com/</a> is the best choice.</li> <li>If using a 64-bit ODBC Driver, you must have a 64-bit JVM.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You must possess third-party or native JDBC drivers that connect to your target database.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteODBCInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (the JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (the JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for Windows
<ol> <li>Download the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (.msi) file.</li> <li>Double-click on the downloaded .msi file to start the installation process.</li> <li>Make sure you have a license file for the driver. Know the location of this file before proceeding with the installation.</li> <li>During the installation process, you may be prompted to click the "Try & Buy" button to obtain a commercial or free evaluation license.</li> <li>You can choose to skip the license file selection process by checking the "I don't want to install a license file right now" checkbox. However, note that you won't be able to use the software until a commercial or evaluation license key is registered.</li> <li>Click "Next" and continue through the dialog until the installation is complete.</li> <li>Click the "Finish" button to finish the installation process.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteODBCDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (JDBC to ODBC Bridge Driver) Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows</a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (JDBC to ODBC Bridge Driver) Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows
<ol> <li> The fourth dialog enables you to set optional ODBC connection parameters. <ul> <li> <strong>Read-only connection</strong> — Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Must be unchecked to INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE records, and to run some Stored Procedures including some built-in functions. </li> <li> <strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> — Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) fields in wildcard queries. This provides significant performance increases when fields in query do not include LONG data fields. </li> <li> <strong>Disable interactive login</strong> — Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application. </li> <li> <strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> — This attribute specifies the number of records to be delivered from the driver to the client application in a single batch. Values can range from 1 to 999. </li> <li> <strong>Max Rows Override</strong> — Allows you to set a limit for the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit. </li> <li> <strong>Initial SQL</strong> — Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection. </li> <li> <strong>Dynamic Cursor Sensitivity</strong> — Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously. If the checksums differ for a row, the row has been updated since it was last fetched and the row status flag is set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED. The row version cache is then updated with the latest checksums for the rowset. From the user's point of view, the only visible difference between the two sensitivity settings is that a row status flag can never be set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED when the cursor sensitivity is low. (The row status is instead displayed as SQL_ROW_SUCCESS.) In all other respects, performance aside, the two settings are the same. Deleted rows don't appear in the rowset. Updates to the row since the row was last fetched are reflected in the row data, and inserted rows appear in the rowset, if their keys fall within the span of the rowset. If your application does not need to detect the row status SQL_ROW_UPDATED, you should leave the High Cursor Sensitivity checkbox unchecked, as performance is improved. The calculation and comparison of checksums for each row fetched carries an overhead. If this option is enabled, the table oplrvc must have been created beforehand using the appropriate script for the target database. </li> <li> <strong>Enable logging to the log file</strong> — Check the checkbox and use the associated textbox to provide the full path to a file in which to log diagnostic information. </li> </ul> </li> <li> Click Next to continue. Start a JDBC-compliant application e.g., the JDBC Demo Application bundled with the OpenLink JDBC-ODBC Bridge Driver Installer Using the following JDBC URL template: <pre> jdbc:openlink://ODBC[/DSN=dsn][/UID=uid][/PWD=pwd][/READONLY=x] </pre> Construct a JDBC URL comprising the following connection attribute name and values pairings: <ul> <li> <strong>/DSN</strong> = Data Source Name (DSN) used to successfully connect to your target database in the prior step </li> <li> <strong>/UID</strong> = database username </li> <li> <strong>/PWD</strong> = password </li> <li> <strong>/READONLY</strong> = Y or N, subject to your preferred Read or Write session mode </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (a/k/a JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for macOS.
<ol> <li>You must have a working ODBC Environment (comprising an ODBC Administrator and Driver Manager) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) JDBC to ODBC Bridge Driver for ODBC Data Sources.</li> <li>You must be able to establish an ODBC connection to one or more target databases using third-party or native ODBC drivers that have already been installed.</li> <li>You must have a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources. <ul> <li>Generally, the latest JVM from <a href="http://java.com/">http://java.com/</a> is the best choice.</li> <li>If using a 64-bit ODBC Driver, you must have a 64-bit JVM.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You must possess third-party or native JDBC drivers that connect to your target database.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteODBCInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Single-Tier(Lite-Edition) Edition JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (a/k/a JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for macOS</a></p>
Installation of the Single-Tier(Lite-Edition) Edition JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (a/k/a JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for macOS
<ol> <li>Download and open the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources disk image (.dmg) file.</li> <li>Double-click the .mpkg file to start the installation process.</li> <li>After the driver has been installed, you will be prompted to locate a license file.</li> <ul> <li>If a correctly named file already exists in $OPL_LICENSE_DIR, /Library/Application Support/OpenLink/Licenses/, you will not see this dialog. If the existing file is not valid (evaluation has expired, it's for a different OS, it permits insufficient processor cores, etc.), you will need to manually apply a valid license file after installation is completed.</li> <li>In some environments, this dialog may be hidden by the Installer.app or other windows on your Mac. Please minimize, hide, and/or move windows until you can see and act on this dialog. If you do not answer this dialog, the installation will not complete properly, and the driver will not function as desired.</li> <li>If a license file already exists on the machine, select the 'use existing' option. (Previously generated license files may be re-downloaded from your ODS-Briefcase data space.)</li> <li>If you need to obtain a new trial or permanent license file, select the 'try or buy' option, which will load a relevant web page from which you can obtain a license file.</li> </ul> <li>When the process is complete, you will be told that the software was successfully installed. Click "Close" and the Single-Tier "docs.openlinksw.com/uda/" Edition JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources is ready for use.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteODBCDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (a/k/a JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for macOS</a></p>
Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) JDBC Driver for ODBC Data Sources (a/k/a JDBC-to-ODBC Bridge), for macOS
<ol> <li> JDBC client applications always require users to provide the Driver Class Name and Connection URL. <ul> <li> <strong>Driver Class Name</strong> -- <code>openlink.jdbc.Driver</code>, <code>openlink.jdbc2.Driver</code>, or <code>openlink.jdbc3.Driver</code>, depending on active JVM. See detailed documentation. </li> <li> <strong>Connection URL</strong> -- See detailed documentation to construct your local URL, which will be of the form: <br> <code>jdbc:openlink://ODBC[/DSN=dsn][/UID=uid][/PWD=pwd][/READONLY=x]</code> <br>For example: <br><code>jdbc:openlink://ODBC/DSN=MyOracleDSN/UID=scott/PWD=tiger</code> <br> <ul> <li> <strong>/DSN</strong> -- Local ODBC Data Source Name </li> <li> <strong>/UID</strong> -- Database Username </li> <li> <strong>/PWD</strong> -- Database Password </li> <li> <strong>/READONLY</strong> -- Read-write or read-only session mode. Values are "Y" or "N". Default is "N", and this is the effect if unset; i.e., a read-write connection. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li> Sometimes the JDBC client applications also require the Driver File Name and/or the path to it. macOS uses /Library/Java/Extensions/ as its default CLASSPATH. All JDBC drivers (or aliases or symbolic links to them) should be installed here, and this is what our installer does. The Driver File Name depends on the active JVM -- <code>opljdbc.jar</code>, <code>opljdbc2.jar</code>, or <code>opljdbc3.jar</code>. See detailed documentation. </li> <li> No further system configuration should be needed. </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Oracle, for Windows
<ol> <li>You must be able to establish a connection with your target Oracle Database using existing Oracle Client Software. If you encounter problems making a connection to your target database, please check the following settings: <ul> <li><strong>Oracle SID:</strong> Specify the Oracle System Identifier (SID) of your database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle TCP Port:</strong> Provide the TCP port number used for communication with the Oracle database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name:</strong> Specify the Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name if required. This is only necessary when the Multi-Tier server components are not installed on the Oracle server.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of Oracle database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Oracle database is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You need to know whether the client application is 32-bit or 64-bit. The Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Oracle must match the bit format of the client application.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteOracleInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle, on Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle, on Windows
<ol> <li>Download and double click on the downloaded <code>.msi</code> file.</li> <li>Your driver needs a license file to operate.</li> <ul> <li>Click the <strong>Browse</strong> button to locate a commercial or evaluation license that you have previously downloaded onto your local hard drive. Alternatively, click the <strong>Try & Buy</strong> button to obtain a commercial or evaluation license.</li> </ul> <li><strong>64-Bit</strong> licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code></li> <li><strong>32-Bit</strong> licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code></li> <li>Proceed to configuring an <strong>ODBC Data Source Name (DSN)</strong> that binds to your target Oracle database.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteOracleDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows</a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows
<ol> <li> Open the "<strong>ODBC Data Sources</strong>" Application. <p>64-bit drivers should be configured with the 64-bit Application.</p> <p>32-bit drivers should be configured with the 32-bit Application.</p> </li> <li> Select the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab, then click <strong>Add</strong>. <p>Select the OpenLink "<strong>Lite</strong>" Driver for Oracle Data Sources from the list of available drivers. Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</p> <p>Click <strong>Finish</strong>.</p> </li> <li> The first dialog prompts for a <strong>Data Source Name</strong> and optional <strong>description</strong>. <p>Click <strong>Next</strong>.</p> </li> <li> The second dialog prompts for the required <strong>Hostname</strong>, <strong>Port Number</strong>, and <strong>Service Name</strong> of the target Oracle Database. If the "<strong>Connect now to verify all settings are correct</strong>" check box is ticked, the optional username and password will be used to make a test connection to the database for that verification. <ul> <li><strong>Hostname</strong> — Hostname or IP address of the machine on which the Oracle Database Server is running</li> <li><strong>Port</strong> — Port Number at which the Oracle Database server is running (1521 by default)</li> <li><strong>Service</strong> — Service name of the target Oracle instance</li> <li><strong>Protocol</strong> — The network protocol to be used for connection (TCP by default)</li> <li><strong>Advanced</strong> — Enables additional Oracle Instant Client connection parameters to be passed, if required</li> <li><strong>XA Info</strong> — This parameter takes another ODBC Data Source Name to achieve Distributed Transaction Processing. More info.</li> <li><strong>Login ID</strong> — The Oracle DBMS user name to use for the connection</li> <li><strong>Password</strong> — The password for the specified Oracle DBMS user</li> </ul> <p>Click <strong>Next</strong> to continue.</p> </li> <li> The third dialog takes a combination of database specific and optional parameters: <ul> <li><strong>OCIPrefetchRows</strong> — Sets the number of rows to be prefetched. More</li> <li><strong>OCIPrefetchMemory</strong> — Sets the memory allocated for rows to be pre-fetched. The application then fetches as many rows as will fit into that much memory. More</li> <li><strong>Custom Catalogue Views</strong> — Dictates whether custom OpenLink views are used to return metadata for certain ODBC catalog functions: SQLForeignKeys(), SQLPrimaryKeys(), SQLProcedureColumns(), SQLProcedures(), and SQLSpecialColumns(). These custom views provide more metadata than is normally provided by the standard Oracle data dictionary views. More</li> <li><strong>Count stored procedure parameters in SQL Procedures</strong> — This parameter is specific to the Oracle data source. It affects the output from SQLProcedures() when "Custom Catalog Views" is enabled. More</li> <li><strong>User's own tables first in SQLTables</strong> — This option is specific to OpenLink's Oracle drivers. It prompts the SQLTables() ODBC API call to display the connected user's tables first in table lists. The default ordering is alphabetical.</li> <li><strong>Show remarks</strong> — Affects output from the SQLColumns() ODBC API call. Use this option in conjunction with Oracle queries. When enabled, the REMARKS column of a SQLColumns() result set includes the comments from the COMMENTS column of the Oracle ALL_COL_COMMENTS data dictionary view. When disabled, the REMARKS column is empty. Disabling Show Remarks improves performance.</li> <li><strong>Empty string isn't NULL behavior</strong> — This parameter forces the driver to differentiate between an Empty string and a NULL, which Oracle does not do by default.</li> <li><strong>Show synonyms in catalog functions</strong> — This parameter return Oracle Table Synonyms in Catalog calls like SQLTables().</li> </ul> <p>Click <strong>Next</strong> to continue.</p> </li> <li> The fourth dialogue enables you to set parameters specific to <strong>Transparent Application Failover</strong>: <ul> <li><strong>Enable TAF</strong> — Instructs the driver to attempt multiple failover connections to alternative DBMS nodes per the Oracle TAF specification. More</li> <li><strong>Maximum Retries</strong> — The maximum number of times that the driver will retry the connection.</li> <li><strong>Retry Interval (secs)</strong> — The number of seconds that the driver will wait between connection attempts.</li> </ul> <p>Click <strong>Next</strong> to continue.</p> </li> <li> The fifth dialogue also enables you to set parameters specific to <strong>OCI Connection Pooling</strong>: <ul> <li><strong>Enable OCI Connection Pooling</strong> — Check to create a separate connection pool for each Oracle instance to which you connect.</li> <li><strong>Minimum Pool Size</strong> — The minimum number of connections to be opened when the pool is created.</li> <li><strong>Maximum Pool Size</strong> — The maximum number of connections that can be opened in the pool.</li> <li><strong>Increment</strong> — The incremental number of connections to be opened when all the connections are busy and a call needs a connection.</li> <li><strong>Linger time</strong> — The amount of time to wait for a connection when all connections are busy and the maximum number of open connections has been reached.</li> <li><strong>Wait for free connection</strong> — The length of time the last connection in the pool should linger before the pool is destroyed.</li> </ul> <p>Click <strong>Next</strong> to continue.</p> </li> <li> The sixth dialog enables you to set optional ODBC connection parameters: <ul> <li><strong>Read-only connection</strong> — Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Must be unchecked to INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE records, and to run some Stored Procedures including some built-in functions.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> — Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) fields in wildcard queries. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login</strong> — Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> — This attribute specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 999.</li> <li><strong>Max rows Override</strong> — Allows you to set a limit for the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Initial SQL</strong> — Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Dynamic Cursor Sensitivity</strong> — Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously.</li> <li><strong>Enable logging to the log file</strong> — Check the checkbox and use the associated textbox to provide the full path to a file in which to log diagnostic information.</li> </ul> <p>Click <strong>Next</strong> to continue.</p> </li> <li> The seventh dialog enables you to set additional parameters to enhance compatibility with applications: <ul> <li><strong>Enable Microsoft Jet engine options</strong> — Facilitates translation of certain data types for the Microsoft Jet Engine. If you notice that money and other datatypes are mishandled with Microsoft or other applications, test with Jet fix enabled.</li> <li><strong>Disable Autocommit</strong> — Changes the commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit</strong> — Disables a limitation enforced by the cursor library. This limitation is enforced by default. It prevents the driver from claiming all available memory when a resultset (typically generated by an accidental query) is very large.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation</strong> — Enables use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, by emulation within the driver.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name</strong> — Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the value should be "SQL Server".</li> </ul> <p>Click <strong>Next</strong> to Continue.</p> </li> <li> The final dialog enables you to test your Data Source. Click the <strong>Test Data Source</strong> button. If successful, the configuration process is complete. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Oracle, for macOS
<ol> <li>You must be able to establish a connection with your target Oracle Database using existing Oracle Client Software. If you encounter problems making a connection to your target database, please check the following settings: <ul> <li><strong>Oracle SID:</strong> Specify the Oracle System Identifier (SID) of your database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle TCP Port:</strong> Provide the TCP port number used for communication with the Oracle database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name:</strong> Specify the Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name if required. This is only necessary when the Multi-Tier server components are not installed on the Oracle server.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of Oracle database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Oracle database is located.</li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteOracleInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle 10g Data Sources, for macOS</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle 10g Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li> Download and open the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle 10g Data Sources. It is distributed in a single disk image (<code>.dmg</code>) file, which contains a Macintosh Installer package (<code>.mpkg</code>). <ul> <li> Double-click the <code>.mpkg</code> to start the installation process. </li> <li> After the driver has been installed, you will be prompted to locate a license file. <blockquote> <strong>NOTE:</strong> If a correctly named file already exists in <code>$OPL_LICENSE_DIR</code>, <code>/Library/Application Support/OpenLink/Licenses/</code>, you will not see this dialog. If the existing file is not valid (evaluation has expired, it's for a different OS, it permits insufficient processor cores, etc.), you will need to manually apply a valid license file after installation is completed. </blockquote> <blockquote> <strong>NOTE:</strong> In some environments, this dialog may be hidden by the Installer.app or other windows on your Mac. Please minimize, hide, and/or move windows until you can see and act on this dialog. If you do not answer this dialog, the installation will not complete properly, and the driver will not function as desired. </blockquote> </li> <li> If a license file already exists on the machine, select the 'use existing' option. (Previously generated license files may be re-downloaded from your ODS-Briefcase data space.) </li> <li> If you need to obtain a new trial or permanent license file, select the 'try or buy' option, which will load a relevant web page from which you can obtain a license file. </li> </ul> </li> <li> To configure an ODBC DSN, run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the <code>/Applications/iODBC</code> folder: </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteOracleDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle 10g Data Sources, for macOS</a></p>
Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle 10g Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li>To configure an ODBC DSN, run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the /Applications/iODBC folder.</li> <li>Click the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab.</li> <li>Click the <strong>Add</strong> button. Then, select the <strong>OpenLink Oracle Lite Driver</strong> from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>Click <strong>Finish</strong>.</li> <li>The <strong>Data Source</strong> tab prompts for information that identifies the Oracle database server and listen port. <ul> <li><strong>DSN:</strong> A brief and meaningful title for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Description:</strong> An optional description for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Oracle Directory:</strong> Provides the full path to your local Oracle or Oracle client installation</li> <li><strong>Connection String:</strong> Your Oracle connection URL. Takes the following form:<br>//oracle_server_ip_address:oracle_listening_port/oracle_SID<br>For example:<br>//openhp2.OpenLinksw.com:1521/ORCL</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong>.</li> <li>The <strong>Connection</strong> tab takes a combination of required and optional parameters to make a connection to the target database: <ul> <li><strong>Username:</strong> A Oracle username</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> This attribute specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>Hide Login Dialog:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Read Only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>OCIPrefetchRows:</strong> Sets the number of rows to be prefetched.</li> <li><strong>OCIPrefetchMemory:</strong> Sets the memory allocated for rows to be pre-fetched.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the return value should be "SQL Server".</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to view additional preferences that can be set for the connection.</li> <li>The third tab contains settings that are not required for a basic connection: <ul> <li><strong>Initialization SQL:</strong> Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Cursor Sensitivity:</strong> Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override:</strong> Allows you to define a limit on the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Show Remarks:</strong> Affects output from the SQLColumns() ODBC API call.</li> <li><strong>Disable autocommit:</strong> Changes the default commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit:</strong> Removes OpenLink's default 100 rowset restriction.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Always include VIEWS in table list:</strong></li> <li><strong>Always include all types in table list:</strong></li> <li><strong>Custom Catalogue Views:</strong> Dictates whether custom OpenLink views are used to return metadata for certain ODBC catalog functions: SQLForeignKeys(), SQLPrimaryKeys(), SQLProcedureColumns(), SQLProcedures(), and SQLSpecialColumns(). These custom views provide more metadata than is normally provided by the standard Oracle data dictionary views.</li> <li><strong>User's own tables first in SQLTables:</strong> This option is specific to OpenLink's Oracle drivers. It prompts the SQLTables() ODBC API call to display the connected user's tables first in table lists. The default ordering is alphabetical.</li> <li><strong>Count stored procedure parameters in SQL Procedures:</strong> This parameter is specific to the Oracle data source. It affects the output from SQLProcedures() when "Custom Catalog Views" is enabled.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click the <strong>Finish</strong> button to save your new Data Source Name.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXSampleAppUsageiODBCDemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Oracle, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You must be able to establish a connection with your target Oracle Database using existing Oracle Client Software. If you encounter problems making a connection to your target database, please check the following settings: <ul> <li><strong>Oracle SID:</strong> Specify the Oracle System Identifier (SID) of your database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle TCP Port:</strong> Provide the TCP port number used for communication with the Oracle database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name:</strong> Specify the SQL*Net or Net Service Name for your Oracle database.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of Oracle database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Oracle database is located.</li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxLiteODBCDriverInstallerInstallationGuide#this'>OpenLink ODBC Driver Installation for Linux </a></p>
Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Oracle 10g+ Data Sources, for Linux
<ol> <li> Prerequisites: <ul> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix shell.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix editor such as vi.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be in possession of relevant database connectivity details such as Database name, Username, password, etc.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> have installed and available either a full installation of Oracle, Oracle Client, or Oracle Instant Client (release 6.x only).</li> </ul> </li> <li> Open the file <code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/openlink.sh</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi. </li> <li> Locate the section that deals with the location of shared libraries pertaining to your system (LD_LIBRARY_PATH, LIBPATH, or SHLIB_PATH) and add to it the location of your Informix lib and lib/esql directories: <pre> LD_LIBRARY_PATH="&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/lib:/oracle/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH" </pre> </li> <li> Open the file <code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/openlink.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi. </li> <li> Locate the <code>[Environment Oracle xxx]</code> section that deals with the driver specific Oracle configuration and edit to reflect your Oracle installation: <pre> [Environment Oracle 10.x] ORACLE_HOME = /oracle/ ;ORACLE_SID = ORCL ;ORACLE_SERVER = T ;TWO_TASK = P: ;ODBC_CATALOGS = Y ; Uncomment after loading odbccat10.sql ;MULTIPLEX_LDA = 5 ; Allow 5 OpenLink clients on a single lda ;OPL_USR_TBLS_FIRST = Y ; Sort SQLTables starting with user tables SHOW_REMARKS = N ; Retrieve SQLColumns REMARKS field CURSOR_SENSITIVITY = LOW ; Set to HIGH after loading odbccat10.sql ;OCI_PREFETCH_ROWS = 100 ; Number of rows to prefetch ;OCI_PREFETCH_MEMORY = 65535 ; Amount of memory to use for prefetching ;NLS_LANG = AMERICAN_AMERICA.UTF8 ; Unicode connection </pre> </li> <li> Open the file <code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi. </li> <li> Locate and edit the sample OpenLink Oracle ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process and edit as follows: <pre> [oracle] Driver = &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/lib/ora100_mt_lt.so ServerType = Oracle 10.x Options = &lt;TNSName&gt; Username = &lt;scott&gt; Password = &lt;**********&gt; FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = DeferLongFetch = JetFix = No Description = Sample Oracle 10.x Lite Connection </pre> </li> <li> Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows: <pre> # cd &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt; # . ./openLink.sh # iodbctest oracle </pre> <blockquote> iODBC Demonstration program<br> This program shows an interactive SQL processor<br> Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105<br> Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (ora100_mt_lt.so)<br> <br> SQL&gt; </blockquote> </li> <li> You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </li> </ol> <p> Additional Information:<br> The bitness of the ODBC Driver for MySQL is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.<br> That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit. </p>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target PostgreSQL instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>PostgreSQL TCP port:</strong> Specify the TCP port number used for communication with the PostgreSQL database.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of the PostgreSQL database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your PostgreSQL database is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You need to know whether the client application is 32-bit or 64-bit. The Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL must match the bit format of the client application.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLitePostgreSQLInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Databases, for Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Databases, for Windows
<ol> <li> The Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources is distributed in a single <code>.msi</code> file. <ul> <li> Download the driver by clicking on the link and then double-click on the downloaded <code>.msi</code> file to start the installation process. </li> <li> Your driver needs a license file to operate. <ul> <li> Click the Browse button to locate a commercial or evaluation license that you have previously downloaded onto your local hard drive. </li> <li> Alternatively, click the Try & Buy button to obtain a commercial or evaluation license. </li> </ul> <strong>NOTE:</strong> 64-Bit licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>, and 32-Bit licenses are installed in <code>C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>. </li> <li> Proceed to configuring an ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) that binds to your target PostgreSQL database. </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLitePostgreSQLDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows</a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows
<ol> <li>Open the "ODBC Data Sources" application.</li> <li>Configure 64-bit drivers using the 64-bit application. Configure 32-bit drivers using the 32-bit application.</li> <li>Select the System DSN tab, then click Add.</li> <li>Select the OpenLink "Lite" Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources from the list of available drivers. Choose the Unicode version of the driver if you are working with multi-byte character sets to avoid unnecessary translations that can impact ODBC performance.</li> <li>Click Finish.</li> <li>The first dialog prompts for a Data Source Name and an optional description. Click Next.</li> <li>The second dialog prompts for information that identifies the PostgreSQL database server and the listening port. It also provides a checkbox to verify basic connection parameters before setting advanced and optional settings. <ol> <li><strong>Host name:</strong> The hostname or IP address of the server where PostgreSQL runs.</li> <li><strong>Port:</strong> The TCP port on which PostgreSQL listens.</li> <li><strong>Database:</strong> The PostgreSQL database.</li> <li><strong>No Transactions:</strong> Enable this option to automatically commit all transactions, which helps prevent memory errors for large transactions. For example, when exporting 10,000 records from Microsoft Access.</li> <li><strong>Connect now to verify that all settings are correct:</strong> The connection will be attempted once you click Continue.</li> <li><strong>Login ID:</strong> A PostgreSQL username.</li> <li><strong>Password:</strong> A valid PostgreSQL database password.</li> </ol> </li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The third dialog allows you to set PostgreSQL-specific parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Enable HSODBC (Oracle Heterogeneous Services) fix:</strong> Check this box if you plan to query PostgreSQL through Oracle HSODBC.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The fourth dialog combines database-specific and optional parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Database:</strong> The Microsoft SQL Server database.</li> <li><strong>Character set:</strong> The client application's character set (8-bit only; the Unicode driver always returns UCS-2 on Windows).</li> <li><strong>Language:</strong> The language in which you want error messages to be returned. It must be supported by the target server.</li> <li><strong>Packet Size:</strong> Specifies the number of bytes per network packet transferred from the database server to the client. Adjusting this value can improve performance. Use 0 for the default packet size specified in the Microsoft SQL Server configuration, -1 to compute the maximum allowable packet size, or an integer from 1 to 10 as a multiple of 512 bytes (e.g., Packet Size of 6 sets the packet size to 6 * 512 = 3072 bytes).</li> <li><strong>Prepare Method:</strong> This option is specific to the TDS-based driver for Sybase & Microsoft SQL Server SQL Servers. It determines whether stored procedures are created on the server for SQLPrepare calls.</li> <li><strong>No Quoted Identifiers:</strong> Indicates that the underlying driver does not support quoted identifiers, which is required for Jet engine-based products like MS Access.</li> <li><strong>Use ANSI nulls, padding, and warnings:</strong> This option affects TDS agent & Lite Driver connections to Microsoft SQL Server databases. It does not affect Sybase connectivity.</li> <li><strong>Map Serializable to Snapshot isolation level:</strong> Enable Snapshot transaction isolation level in the driver.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> <li>The fifth dialog allows you to set optional ODBC connection parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Read-only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is read-only. Uncheck this option to perform INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE operations.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) fields in wildcard queries, improving performance when the query does not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC-compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> Specifies the number of records to be delivered from the driver to the client application in a single batch (values range from 1 to 999).</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override:</strong> Allows you to set a limit for the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Initial SQL:</strong> Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements to be automatically executed against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Dynamic Cursor Sensitivity:</strong> Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors.</li> <li><strong>Enable logging to the log file:</strong> Check this option and provide the full path to a file to log diagnostic information.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> <li>The sixth dialog enables you to set additional parameters to enhance compatibility with applications. <ul> <li><strong>Enable Microsoft Jet engine options:</strong> Facilitates translation of certain data types for the Microsoft Jet Engine.</li> <li><strong>Disable Autocommit:</strong> Changes the commit behavior of the OpenLink driver.</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit:</strong> Disables a limitation enforced by the cursor library to prevent excessive memory usage with large result sets.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation:</strong> Enables the use of Multiple Active Statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not support it.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next to continue.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL, for macOS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your PostgreSQL Server: <ul> <li><strong>PostgreSQL TCP port:</strong> Specify the TCP port number used for communication with the PostgreSQL database.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of the PostgreSQL database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your PostgreSQL database is located.</li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLitePostgreSQLInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources, for macOS </a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li> Download and open the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources. It is distributed in a single disk image (<code>.dmg</code>) file, which contains a Macintosh Installer package (<code>.mpkg</code>). <ul> <li> Double-click the <code>.mpkg</code> to start the installation process. </li> <li> After the driver has been installed, you will be prompted to locate a license file. <blockquote> <strong>NOTE:</strong> If a correctly named file already exists in <code>$OPL_LICENSE_DIR</code>, <code>/Library/Application Support/OpenLink/Licenses/</code>, you will not see this dialog. If the existing file is not valid (evaluation has expired, it's for a different OS, it permits insufficient processor cores, etc.), you will need to manually apply a valid license file after installation is completed. </blockquote> <blockquote> <strong>NOTE:</strong> In some environments, this dialog may be hidden by the Installer.app or other windows on your Mac. Please minimize, hide, and/or move windows until you can see and act on this dialog. If you do not answer this dialog, the installation will not complete properly, and the driver will not function as desired. </blockquote> </li> <li> If a license file already exists on the machine, select the 'use existing' option. (Previously generated license files may be re-downloaded from your ODS-Briefcase data space.) </li> <li> If you need to obtain a new trial or permanent license file, select the 'try or buy' option, which will load a relevant web page from which you can obtain a license file. </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLitePostgreSQLDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources, for macOS </a></p>
Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li>To configure an ODBC DSN, run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the /Applications/iODBC folder:</li> <li>Click the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab.</li> <li>Click the <strong>Add</strong> button.</li> <li>Then, select the <strong>OpenLink PostgreSQL Lite Driver</strong> from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> <li>Click <strong>Finish</strong>.</li> <li>The <strong>Data Source</strong> tab prompts for information that identifies the PostgreSQL database server and listen port. It also requests a name for your Data Source. You may also supply an optional description for your Data Source Name. <ul> <li><strong>DSN:</strong> A brief and meaningful title for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Description:</strong> An optional description for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Hostname:</strong> The hostname or IP of the server on which PostgreSQL runs</li> <li><strong>Port number:</strong> The TCP port on which PostgreSQL listens</li> </ul> </li> <li>Press <strong>Continue</strong> once your data source details have been added.</li> <li>The <strong>Connection</strong> Tab takes a combination of required and optional parameters to make a connection to the target database: <ul> <li><strong>Username:</strong> A PostgreSQL username</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> This attribute specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>Hide Login Dialog:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Read Only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>Database:</strong> A valid PostgreSQL database</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the return value should be "SQL Server".</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> once your connection parameters have been set.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to view additional preferences that can be set for the connection. <ul> <li><strong>Initialization SQL:</strong> Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Cursor Sensitivity:</strong> Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override:</strong> Allows you to define a limit on the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Show remarks:</strong> Affects output from the SQLColumns() ODBC API call.</li> <li><strong>Disable autocommit:</strong> Changes the default commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit:</strong> Removes OpenLink's default 100 rowset restriction.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Always include VIEWS in table list:</strong></li> <li><strong>Always include all types in table list:</strong></li> <li><strong>Custom Catalogue Views:</strong> Dictates whether custom OpenLink views are used to return metadata for certain ODBC catalog functions: SQLForeignKeys(), SQLPrimaryKeys(), SQLProcedureColumns(), SQLProcedures(), and SQLSpecialColumns(). These custom views provide more metadata than is normally provided by the standard Oracle data dictionary views.</li> <li><strong>User's own tables first in SQLTables:</strong> This option is specific to OpenLink's Oracle drivers. It prompts the SQLTables() ODBC API call to display the connected user's tables first in table lists. The default ordering is alphabetical.</li> <li><strong>Count stored procedure parameters in SQL Procedures:</strong> This parameter is specific to the Oracle data source. It affects the output from SQLProcedures() when "Custom Catalog Views" is enabled.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click the <strong>Finish</strong> button to save your new Data Source Name.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXSampleAppUsageiODBCDemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your PostgreSQL Server: <ul> <li><strong>PostgreSQL TCP port:</strong> Specify the TCP port number used for communication with the PostgreSQL database.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of the PostgreSQL database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your PostgreSQL database is located.</li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxLiteODBCDriverInstallerInstallationGuide#this'>OpenLink ODBC Driver Installation for Linux </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Microsoft SQL Server instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>The Microsoft SQL Server version:</strong> Identify the version of Microsoft SQL Server you are targeting.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server instance name:</strong> Specify the name of your SQL Server instance.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server listen port:</strong> Provide the listening port used by your SQL Server.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database name:</strong> Specify the name of the target database you want to connect to.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database server hostname or IP address:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your SQL Server is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You need to know whether the client application is 32-bit or 64-bit. The Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server must match the bit format of the client application.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteSQLServerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources, for Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources, for Windows
<ol> <li> Download and double click on the downloaded <code>.msi</code> file. </li> <li> Your driver needs a license file to operate. <ul> <li> Click the <strong>Browse</strong> button to locate a commercial or evaluation license that you have previously downloaded onto your local hard drive. </li> <li> Alternatively, click the <strong>Try & Buy</strong> button to obtain a commercial or evaluation license. </li> </ul> </li> <li> <strong>64-Bit licenses</strong> are installed in <code>C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>. </li> <li> <strong>32-Bit licenses</strong> are installed in <code>C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\</code>. </li> <li> Proceed to configuring an ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) that binds to your target SQL Server database. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsLiteSQLServerDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for SQL Server Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows</a></p>
Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for SQL Server Data Source Name (DSN) Configuration for Windows
<ol> <li>Open the "ODBC Data Sources" Application.</li> <li> <ul> <li><strong>64-bit drivers</strong> should be configured with the 64-bit Application.</li> <li><strong>32-bit drivers</strong> should be configured with the 32-bit Application.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Select the System DSN tab, then click Add.</li> <li> <ul> <li>Select the OpenLink "Lite" Driver for MySQL Data Sources from the list of available drivers. Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Finish.</li> <li>"The first dialog prompts for a Data Source Name and optional description.</li> <li>Click Next."</li> <li>"The second dialog prompts for information that identifies the Microsoft SQL Server DBMS and database. It also provides a checkbox that allows you to check your basic connection parameters before setting advanced and optional settings. <ul> <li><strong>Server Name</strong> - Select the drop-down list box to invoke the driver's Dynamic discovery of Microsoft SQL Server instance on the network and choose the required instance, if listed.</li> <li><strong>Connect now to verify that all settings are correct</strong> - Will attempt to connect to the database once you click Continue.</li> <li><strong>Login ID</strong> - A valid Microsoft SQL Server username</li> <li><strong>Password</strong> - A valid Microsoft SQL Server password</li> <li>Use the Advanced button to manually configure a connection if the Microsoft SQL Server instance could not be dynamically located, as detailed below.</li> <li><strong>ServerType</strong> - An OpenLink proprietary parameter that associates the connection with a particular TDS version.</li> <li><strong>Hostname</strong> - The hostname or IP address on which Microsoft SQL Server listens</li> <li><strong>Port number</strong> - The TCP port on which Microsoft SQL Server lists</li> <li><strong>Server Name</strong> - Microsoft SQL Server instance name on the specified host. A Microsoft SQL Server instance can also be specified by appending "\InstanceName" to the ServerName, i.e., "ServerName\InstanceName"</li> <li><strong>Mirror Host</strong> - The name of the Failover Server hosting the mirrored database if configured</li> <li><strong>Use strong encryption of data</strong> - Enable SSL encryption of data between driver and database</li> <li><strong>Use Mars</strong> - Multiple Active Result Sets enables the concurrent processing of multiple statements/queries and/or result sets on a single connection</li> <li><strong>Verify Server Certificate</strong> - Verify the Database Server SSL certificate against the one specified in the "CA file" field</li> <li><strong>CA file</strong> - Specify the location of a Valid SSL Certificate for use during the connection</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>"The third dialog takes a combination of database-specific and optional parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Database</strong> - The Microsoft SQL Server database</li> <li><strong>Character set</strong> - The client application's character set (8-bit only; the Unicode driver always returns UCS-2 on Windows).</li> <li><strong>Language</strong> - The language you want error messages returned in; must be supported by the target server.</li> <li><strong>Packet Size</strong> - A value that determines the number of bytes per network packet transferred from the database server to the client. The correct setting of this attribute can improve performance. When set to 0, the initial default, the driver uses the default packet size as specified in the Microsoft SQL Server configuration. When set to -1, the driver computes the maximum allowable packet size on the first connect to the data source and saves the value in the system information. When set to x, an integer from 1 to 10, which indicates a multiple of 512 bytes (for example, Packet Size of 6 means to set the packet size to 6 * 512 equal 3072 bytes). For you to take advantage of this connection attribute, you must configure the System 10 server for a maximum network packet size greater than or equal to the value you specified for Packet Size.</li> <li><strong>Prepare Method</strong> - This option is specific to the TDS-based driver for Sybase & Microsoft SQL Server SQL Servers. It can take the values None, Partial, or Full (connectoptions = -O [0, 1, 2] respectively). It is used to determine whether stored procedures are created on the server for calls to SQLPrepare.</li> <li><strong>No Quoted Identifiers</strong> - This option indicates that the underlying driver does not support quoted identifiers, which is required for Jet engine-based products like MS Access.</li> <li><strong>Use ANSI nulls, padding and warnings</strong> - This option affects TDS agent & Lite Driver connections to Microsoft SQL Server databases. Sybase connectivity is not affected.</li> <li><strong>Map Serializable to Snapshot isolation level</strong> - Enable Snapshot transaction isolation level in the driver. Snapshot Isolation is a new transaction isolation level available in Microsoft SQL Server 2005.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>"The fourth dialog enables you to set optional ODBC connection parameters. <ul> <li><strong>Read-only connection</strong> — Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Must be unchecked to INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE records, and to run some Stored Procedures including some built-in functions.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> — Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) fields in wildcard queries. This provides significant performance increases when fields in query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login</strong> — Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> — This attribute specifies the number of records to be delivered from the driver to the client application in a single batch. Values can range from 1 to 999.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override</strong> — Allows you to set a limit for the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Initial SQL</strong> — Lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Dynamic Cursor Sensitivity</strong> — Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously. If the checksums differ for a row, the row has been updated since it was last fetched and the row status flag is set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED. The row version cache is then updated with the latest checksums for the rowset. From the user's point of view, the only visible difference between the two sensitivity settings is that a row status flag can never be set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED when the cursor sensitivity is low. (The row status is instead displayed as SQL_ROW_SUCCESS.) In all other respects, performance aside, the two settings are the same. Deleted rows don't appear in the rowset. Updates to the row since the row was last fetched are reflected in the row data, and inserted rows appear in the rowset, if their keys fall within the span of the rowset. If your application does not need to detect the row status SQL_ROW_UPDATED, you should leave the High Cursor Sensitivity checkbox unchecked, as performance is improved. The calculation and comparison of checksums for each row fetched carry an overhead. If this option is enabled, the table oplrvc must have been created beforehand using the appropriate script for the target database.</li> <li><strong>Enable logging to the log file</strong> — Check the checkbox and use the associated textbox to provide the full path to a file in which to log diagnostic information.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>"The fifth dialog enables you to set additional parameters to enhance compatibility with applications. <ul> <li><strong>Enable Microsoft Jet engine options</strong> — Facilitates the translation of certain data types for the Microsoft Jet Engine. If you notice that money and other data types are mishandled with Microsoft or other applications, test with Jet fix enabled.</li> <li><strong>Disable Autocommit</strong> — Changes the commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit</strong> — Disables a limitation enforced by the cursor library. This limitation is enforced by default. It prevents the driver from claiming all available memory when a resultset (typically generated by an accidental query) is very large. The limit is not normally reached.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation</strong> — Enables the use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, by emulation within the driver.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name</strong> — Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the value should be "SQL Server".</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click Next.</li> <li>The final dialog enables you to test your Data Source. Click the Test Data Source button.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server, for macOS
<ol> <li>Ensure you have the following client connectivity information for your target Microsoft SQL Server Database: <ul> <li><strong>SQL Server instance name:</strong> Specify the name of your SQL Server instance.</li> <li><strong>SQL Server hostname or IP address:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your SQL Server is located.</li> <li><strong>SQL Server listening port:</strong> Specify the listening port used by your SQL Server.</li> <li><strong>Target Database name:</strong> Specify the name of the target database you want to connect to (e.g., "Northwind").</li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteSQLServerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources, for macOS</a></p>
Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li> Download and open the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources. It is distributed in a single disk image (<code>.dmg</code>) file, which contains a Macintosh Installer package (<code>.mpkg</code>). <ul> <li> Double-click the <code>.mpkg</code> file to start the installation process. </li> <li> After the driver has been installed, you will be prompted to locate a license file. <blockquote> <strong>NOTE:</strong> If a correctly named file already exists in <code>$OPL_LICENSE_DIR</code>, <code>/Library/Application Support/OpenLink/Licenses/</code>, you will not see this dialog. If the existing file is not valid (evaluation has expired, it's for a different OS, it permits insufficient processor cores, etc.), you will need to manually apply a valid license file after installation is completed. </blockquote> <blockquote> <strong>NOTE:</strong> In some environments, this dialog may be hidden by the Installer.app or other windows on your Mac. Please minimize, hide, and/or move windows until you can see and act on this dialog. If you do not answer this dialog, the installation will not complete properly, and the driver will not function as desired. </blockquote> </li> <li> If a license file already exists on the machine, select the 'use existing' option. (Previously generated license files may be re-downloaded from your ODS-Briefcase data space.) </li> <li> If you need to obtain a new trial or permanent license file, select the 'try or buy' option, which will load a relevant web page from which you can obtain a license file. </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteSQLServerDataSourceNameConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources, for macOS</a></p>
Configuration of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Data Sources, for macOS
<ol> <li>To configure an ODBC DSN, run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the /Applications/iODBC folder:</li> <li>Click the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab:</li> <li>Click the <strong>Add</strong> button. Then, select the OpenLink SQL Server Lite Driver from the list of available drivers. Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance:</li> <li>Click <strong>Finish</strong>.</li> <li>The <strong>Data Source</strong> tab prompts for a DSN name, description, and information that identifies the target Microsoft SQL Server DBMS:</li> <ul> <li><strong>DSN</strong> - (Required) A brief and meaningful title for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Description</strong> - (Optional) A longer description for your Data Source Name</li> <li><strong>Server Name</strong> - (Required) Use the drop-down menu to invoke the driver's dynamic discovery of Microsoft SQL Server instances on the network and choose the desired instance.</li> <li>Use the "Advanced" button to manually configure a connection if the Microsoft SQL Server instance could not be dynamically located, as detailed below:</li> <li><strong>Server Type</strong> - An OpenLink proprietary parameter that associates the connection with a particular TDS version.</li> <li><strong>Hostname</strong> - The hostname or IP address on which Microsoft SQL Server listens. May include an instance name, as discussed below (e.g., "MySQLHost.example.com\MySQLInstance").</li> <li><strong>Port number</strong> - The TCP port on which Microsoft SQL Server listens. Leave blank when SQL Server TCP/IP port setting is "Dynamic."</li> <li><strong>Server Name</strong> - (Optional) Microsoft SQL Server instance name on the specified host. Usually not specified unless SQL Server TCP/IP port setting is "Dynamic." Though not optimal, a Microsoft SQL Server instance name can be specified by instead appending "\\InstanceName" to the Hostname field above (e.g., "MySQLHost.example.com\\MySQLInstance").</li> <li><strong>Mirror Host</strong> - The name of the Failover Server hosting the mirrored database if configured</li> <li><strong>Use strong encryption of data</strong> - The driver will demand an SSL encrypted connection to the Microsoft SQL Server instance. If the target instance is not configured for or capable of SSL connections, the connection will fail. This setting is not needed for connections to Microsoft SQL Server instances which are configured to demand SSL connections from clients; such demands are handled automatically by the driver. Note that SSL connections are never supported by Microsoft SQL Server 7 or earlier, nor when using TDS Version 7.0 or 4.2.</li> <li><strong>Use MARS</strong> - Multiple Active Result Sets enables the concurrent processing of multiple statements/queries and/or result sets on a single connection.</li> <li><strong>Verify Server Certificate</strong> - Verify the SSL Certificate presented by the database server against the one specified in the "CA file" field</li> <li><strong>CA file</strong> - Specify the location of a Valid SSL Certificate for use during the connection</li> </ul> <li>After selecting your preferences, click <strong>OK</strong> to continue.</li> <li>The <strong>Connection</strong> Tab takes a combination of required and optional parameters required to make a connection to the target database:</li> <ul> <li><strong>User name</strong> - A valid Microsoft SQL Server username. Windows Authentication may be triggered by using the DOMAIN\username syntax.</li> <li><strong>Choose a database, charset, language to use with the data source</strong></li> <li><strong>Password</strong> - A valid Microsoft SQL Server (or Windows Authentication) password</li> <li><strong>Database</strong> - The Microsoft SQL Server catalog/schema you want to work with</li> <li><strong>Language</strong> - The language for SQL Server error messages</li> <li><strong>Character set</strong> - The character set (a/k/a codepage) required by your ODBC client application. For most users, the default is best. The driver will automatically translate between this codepage and whatever the SQL Server is using.</li> <li><strong>Disable character set translation</strong> - All character IDs will be passed directly from ODBC client application to SQL Server, with no translation. This is rarely desirable and is provided to address historic issues.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong>.</li> <li>The <strong>Options</strong> tab enables you to set some standard and Microsoft SQL Server specific parameters:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> - This attribute specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>Hide Login Dialog</strong> - Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Read Only connection</strong> - Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>TDS packet size</strong> - A value that determines the number of bytes per network packet transferred from the database server to the client. The correct setting of this attribute can improve performance. When set to 0, the initial default, the driver uses the default packet size as specified in the Sybase server configuration. When set to -1, the driver computes the maximum allowable packet size on the first connect to the data source and saves the value in the system information. When set to x, an integer from 1 to 10, which indicates a multiple of 512 bytes (for example, Packet Size of 6 means to set the packet size to 6 * 512 equal 3072 bytes). For you to take advantage of this connection attribute, you must configure the System 10 server for a maximum network packet size greater than or equal to the value you specified for Packet Size.</li> <li><strong>Prepare Method</strong> - This option is specific to the TDS Driver for Sybase and Microsoft SQL Server. It can take the values None, Partial, or Full (connectoptions -O [0, 1, 2] respectively). It is used to determine whether stored procedures are created on the server for calls to SQLPrepare().</li> <li><strong>No Quoted Identifiers</strong> - This option indicates that the underlying driver does not support quoted identifiers, which is required for Jet engine based products like MS Access.</li> <li><strong>Use ANSI nulls, padding and warnings</strong> - This option affects TDS agent & Lite Driver connections to Microsoft SQL Server databases. Sybase connectivity is not affected.</li> <li><strong>Map Serializable to Snapshot isolation level</strong> - Enable Snapshot transaction isolation level in the driver. Snapshot Isolation is a new transaction isolation level first available in Microsoft SQL Server 2005.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS Name</strong> - Manuallyoverrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath for which the return value should be "SQL Server".</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to view additional preferences that can be set for the connection.</li> <li>The <strong>Initialization SQL</strong> field lets you specify a file containing SQL statements that will be run automatically against the database upon connection.</li> <li><strong>Cursor Sensitivity</strong> - Enables or disables the row version cache used with dynamic cursors. When dynamic cursor sensitivity is set high, the Cursor Library calculates checksums for each row in the current rowset and compares these with the checksums (if any) already stored in the row version cache for the same rows when fetched previously. If the checksums differ for a row, the row has been updated since it was last fetched and the row status flag is set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED. The row version cache is then updated with the latest checksums for the rowset. From the user's point of view, the only visible difference between the two sensitivity settings is that a row status flag can never be set to SQL_ROW_UPDATED when the cursor sensitivity is low. (The row status is instead displayed as SQL_ROW_SUCCESS.) In all other respects, performance aside, the two settings are the same. Deleted rows don't appear in the rowset. Updates to the row since the row was last fetched are reflected in the row data, and inserted rows appear in the rowset if their keys fall within the span of the rowset. If your application does not need to detect the row status SQL_ROW_UPDATED, you should leave the 'High Cursor Sensitivity' checkbox unchecked, as performance is improved. The calculation and comparison of checksums for each row fetched carries an overhead. If this option is enabled, the table oplrvc must have been created beforehand using the appropriate script for the target database.</li> <li><strong>Max Rows Override</strong> - Allows you to define a limit on the maximum number of rows to be returned from a query. The default value of 0 means no limit.</li> <li><strong>Enable Microsoft Jet Engine options</strong></li> <li><strong>Disable autocommit</strong> - Changes the default commit behavior of the OpenLink driver. The default mode is AutoCommit (box unchecked).</li> <li><strong>Disable rowset size limit</strong> - Removes OpenLink's default 100 rowset restriction.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> - Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation</strong></li> <li><strong>Always include VIEWS in table list</strong> - This switch is needed for Microsoft Excel and Query, Stata, and some other tools that explicitly request only TABLEs from the back-end DBMS. Tick this box if you also need to see VIEWS in the graphical query builder. This option is redundant when Always include all types is ticked.</li> <li><strong>Always include all types in table list</strong> - This switch is needed for Microsoft Excel and Query, Stata, and some other tools that explicitly request only TABLEs from the back-end DBMS. Tick this box if you also need to see SYSTEM TABLEs, VIEWS, SYSTEM VIEWS, SYNONYMs, GLOBAL TEMPORARYs, ALIASes, and/or LOCAL TEMPORARYs in the graphical query builder. Note: the TABLE list will be much longer thanwhen this box is not ticked, and SYSTEM objects will be sorted to the top of the list due to typical naming conventions.</li> <li>When finished, click the <strong>Finish</strong> button to save your new Data Source Name.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXSampleAppUsageiODBCDemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your Microsoft SQL Server DBMS:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server instance name:</strong> The name of the Microsoft SQL Server instance.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server listen port:</strong> The port number on which the Microsoft SQL Server is listening.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database name:</strong> The name of the database within the Microsoft SQL Server.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database server hostname or IP address:</strong> The hostname or IP address of the server where the Microsoft SQL Server is running.</li> </ul> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxLiteODBCDriverInstallerInstallationGuide#this'>OpenLink ODBC Driver Installation for Linux </a></p>
Configuration of Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Linux or Unix
<ol> <li> Prerequisites: <ul> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix shell.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix editor such as vi.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be in possession of relevant database connectivity details such as Database name, Username, password, etc.</li> </ul> </li> <li> Open the file <code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi. </li> <li> Locate and edit the sample OpenLink SQL Server ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process and edit as follows: <pre> [sqlserver] Driver = &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/lib/sql_mt_lu.so ServerType = SQLServer 2000 Options = -H sqlserver.hostname -P 1433 Database = database UserName = sa Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = </pre> </li> <li> Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows: <pre> # cd &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt; # . ./openLink.sh # iodbctest sqlserver </pre> <blockquote> iODBC Demonstration program<br> This program shows an interactive SQL processor<br> Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105<br> Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (sql_mt_lt.so)<br> <br> SQL&gt; </blockquote> </li> <li> You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </li> </ol> <p> Additional Information:<br> The bitness of the ODBC Driver for MySQL is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.<br> That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit. </p>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know whether the client application is <strong>32-bit</strong> or <strong>64-bit</strong>.</li> <li>The Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers must match the bit format of the client application.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Database Agents, on Windows</a></p>
Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on Windows Operating Systems
<ol> <li> The OpenLink Generic JDBC Driver for Windows is distributed in a single .msi file. </li> <li> Click the <strong>Open link</strong> that appears in your Downloads dialog, or double-click the file. </li> <li> Click <strong>Next</strong>. </li> <li> Choose among the <strong>Typical</strong>, <strong>Complete</strong>, or <strong>Custom</strong> installation types. </li> <li> Click <strong>Next</strong>. </li> <li> Use the next dialog to specify the installation directory, if you chose the custom installation option: <ul> <li> Click <strong>Next</strong>. </li> <li> You can choose which options to install if you chose the custom installation option: <ul> <li> Click <strong>Next</strong>. </li> <li> Then click the <strong>Install</strong> button. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li> Installation is complete. <blockquote><code>Click the Finish button.</code></blockquote> </li> <li> You may be prompted to restart your computer if you have a pre-existing OpenLink License Manager running on your computer. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsMulti-TierGenericJDBCDriverConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on Windows Operating Systems</a></p>
Installation of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Windows
<ol> <li> Our Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic ODBC client is distributed in a single Windows MSI file. Double click on the downloaded <code>.msi</code> to start the installation. </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Installation of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Database Agents, on Windows
<ol> <li> Our Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) server components installers for Windows are distributed as .msi files. You need to download one Enterprise Edition Request Broker installer (<code>ntbrzzzz.msi</code> for all 32-bit processor architectures, <code>wabrzzzz.msi</code> for x86_64, or <code>wibrzzzz.msi</code> for IA_64) and at least one Agent installer (same architecture) for the specific target data source(s). Double-click on the downloaded request broker <code>.MSI</code> file to start the installation. </li> <li> The Request Broker installers will specifically prompt for the location of a local license file. <br><br> <strong>Note:</strong> Agent installers do not, as their licensing is handled through the Broker. </li> <li> Click the "<strong>Browse</strong>" button to locate a license file on your Windows machine. </li> <li> Check the "<strong>I don't want to install a license file</strong>" box if you do not have one. </li> <li> Once Completed, run the Database agent installation by clicking on the downloaded <code>.MSI</code> file. </li> <li> The Request Broker can be started and stopped by locating the OpenLink Request Broker service in the Services panel, or by using the toolbar service shortcut provided after installation. </li> <li> Installation is complete, proceed to making a test connection with your Client Component installation. If you haven't installed this component, please follow one of the following </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Configuration of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Windows
<ol> <li>Launch the ODBC Administrator appropriate to the bitness (32-bit or 64-bit) of your client application and driver.</li> <li>Click the <strong>Add</strong> button that appears on the <strong>System DSN</strong> tab.</li> <li>Select the <strong>OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver</strong> from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>The first DSN configuration dialog takes these values: <ul> <li><strong>Name:</strong> A suitable name for your Data Source</li> <li><strong>Description:</strong> An optional description for your Data Source</li> <li><strong>Server:</strong> The host name or IP address of the machine containing your OpenLink Request Broker and the Broker's listen port. A colon separates the two. For example: <code>192.158.12.234:5000</code></li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Next</strong>.</li> <li>The second DSN configuration dialog takes these values: <ul> <li><strong>Domain:</strong> The value must match a <strong>[Domain Alias]</strong>, which is contained in the Server's Session Rules Book. This Alias typically represents the name and version of an OpenLink Agent. That agent version may differ from the DBMS version to which it connects. Note that advanced users may create custom domain names that follow their own desired conventions.</li> <li><strong>Database:</strong> Takes a database name or Oracle SID.</li> <li><strong>Options:</strong> This field passes parameters that enable users to connect to MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLServer, and Sybase databases anywhere on the network. It also passes parameters that enable users to connect to any DBMS that does not reside on the same machine as the OpenLink Request Broker and Agent. <a href="http://wikis.openlinksw.com/UdaWikiWeb/MTServerConfigConnectOptions">Review Complete Settings and Usage for Connect Options</a>.</li> <li><strong>Secure Connection:</strong> If checked, the client sets up a secure connection to the Request Broker.</li> <li><strong>Connect now to verify that all settings are correct:</strong> Will attempt to connect to the database once you click Continue.</li> <li><strong>Login ID:</strong> A valid database UID.</li> <li><strong>Password:</strong> A valid database password.</li> <li><strong>XA Info:</strong> Refer to OpenLink's extensive Distributed Transaction Processing documentation for use of this field.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Next</strong>.</li> <li>The third tab contains settings that are not required for a basic connection: <ul> <li><strong>Read Only connection:</strong> Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data:</strong> Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query. This provides significant performance increases when fields in the query do not include LONG data fields.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login:</strong> Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC-compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation:</strong> Enables the use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, as it is emulated in the driver.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size:</strong> Specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li><strong>SQL_DBMS_NAME:</strong> Manually overrides the SQLGetInfo(SQL_DBMS_NAME) response returned by the driver. This is required for products like Microsoft InfoPath (for which the return value should be "SQL Server").</li> </ul> </li> <li>Click <strong>Next</strong>.</li> <li>Click on the 'Test Data Source' button to make a connection to the database to verify connectivity. A successful connection to the database has been made.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on Windows Operating Systems
<ol> <li> The OpenLink installer should set your CLASSPATH. You should have a pre-existing <strong>JAVA_HOME</strong> directory that points to the root of your Java installation; this same directory should also be included in your PATH. No further configuration should be needed. </li> <li> <strong>Driver Name:</strong> <code>opljdbc.jar, opljdbc2.jar, opljdbc3.jar, megathin.jar, megathin2.jar, megathin3.jar</code> <br> <strong>Driver Class Name:</strong> <code>openlink.jdbc.Driver, openlink.jdbc2.Driver, openlink.jdbc3.Driver</code> <br> <strong>Connection URL:</strong> <pre><code>jdbc:openlink://&lt;Hostname&gt;:[portnumber] [/UID] [/PWD] [/READONLY] [/SVT] [/APPLICATION] [/FBS|FETCHBUFFERSIZE] [/ENCRYPTED] [/CHARSET] [/UNICODE] [/DLF] [/DATABASE] [/OPTIONS] [/DRIVER]</code></pre> <br> <ul> <li><strong>Hostname</strong> - DNS-resolvable hostname or IP address of the machine that runs an OpenLink Request Broker instance.</li> <li><strong>Port Number</strong> - TCP port on which the Request Broker listens.</li> <li><strong>/UID</strong> - Database username.</li> <li><strong>/PWD</strong> - Database password.</li> <li><strong>/READONLY</strong> - Read-write or read-only session mode.</li> <li><strong>/SVT</strong> - A valid domain alias from the [Domain Aliases] section of the OpenLink server component's oplrqb.ini file. Default domain aliases represent the type of database agent to which the application intends to connect, e.g., DB2, Informix 2000, Oracle 8.1.x. Custom aliases may be any string.</li> <li><strong>/APPLICATION</strong> - The Application name. Enables connectivity when restrictive server-side rules screen by application name.</li> <li><strong>/FBS</strong> - (also /FETCHBUFFERSIZE) The number of rows to return during one fetch operation.</li> <li><strong>/ENCRYPTED</strong> - Encrypt outgoing OpenLink communications packets. Disabled by default. Enabled with '1', 'Y', 'y'; disabled with '0', 'N', 'n'.</li> <li><strong>/CHARSET</strong> - The charset of remote databases. The default value is read from System.getProperty("file.encoding").</li> <li><strong>/UNICODE</strong> - Enables a Unicode connection. Disabled by default. Enabled with '1', 'Y', 'y'; disabled with '0', 'N', 'n'.</li> <li><strong>/DLF</strong> - Defers large data fields (BLOB, CLOB, etc.) to the end of the resultset. Smaller data types are retrieved first. This enhances performance. Disabled by default. Enabled with '1', 'Y', 'y'; disabled with '0', 'N', 'n'.</li> <li><strong>/DATABASE</strong> - Actual database name within a particular database environment.</li> <li><strong>/OPTIONS</strong> - Optional connection attribute passes specialized database-native client connection parameters, such as Progress socket parameters, Oracle SQL*Net Service Names, Ingres vnodes, remote Informix instance names, or DB2 remote database aliases. Not necessary when ConnectOptions are set in the Broker Rulebook.</li> <li><strong>/DRIVER</strong> - An ODBC Driver name wrapped in braces ("{}"). Used for DSN-Less connections to remote ODBC Drivers.</li> </ul> </li> <li> <strong>Examples:</strong> <ul> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=Ingres II/DATABASE=iidbdb/UID=ingres/PWD=ingres</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://192.128.13.119:5555/SVT=Oracle 8.1.x/DATABASE=ORCL/UID=scott/PWD=tiger</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://broker-host.example.com:5050/SVT=Progress 91D/DATABASE=isports/OPTIONS=-S isports -N tcp -H progress-host.example.com</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://broker-host.example.com:5000/SVT=SQLServer 2000/DATABASE=Northwind/UID=sa/OPTIONS= -S mssql-host.example.com</code></li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers for macOS Clients
<ol> <li>There are no DBMS requirements associated with the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers.</li> <li>The Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers are distributed as Universal Binaries, automatically supporting all 32-bit and 64-bit clients, with both PowerPC- and Intel-based binaries.</li> </ol>
<p></p>
Installation of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on macOS
<ol> <li>Download the OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver for macOS disk image (.dmg) file.</li> <li>Double-click the disk image file to open it.</li> <li>Run the installer .mpkg file located inside the disk image.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXMulti-TierGenericODBCClientConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on macOS</a></p>
Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on macOS Operating Systems
<ol> <li> Download the OpenLink Generic JDBC Driver for macOS, which comes in a .dmg file. </li> <li> Double-click the .dmg file to start the installation process. </li> <li> Confirm the warning message to proceed with the installation. </li> <li> Read and accept the License Agreement for the OpenLink Generic JDBC Driver. </li> <li> Choose the destination volume for the installation (typically your macOS boot volume). </li> <li> Select the installation type: <ul> <li> <strong>Easy Install (recommended).</strong> </li> <li> <strong>Custom Install</strong> (for experienced users who want to choose specific components). <ul> <li> If you have installed OpenLink or iODBC components in the past, select "Upgrade" to continue. Otherwise, click "Install." </li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li> If you chose the custom installation option, select the desired components to install. <ul> <li> Click <strong>Next</strong>. </li> <li> Enter your macOS Username and Password when prompted to complete the installation. </li> </ul> </li> <li> After installation, your database driver is ready for use. </li> <li> For configuring the OpenLink Generic JDBC Driver, use the following parameters in the Connection URL: <ul> <li> <strong>Driver Name:</strong> opljdbc3.jar, megathin3.jar </li> <li> <strong>Driver Class Name:</strong> openlink.jdbc3.Driver </li> <li> <strong>Connection URL:</strong> jdbc:openlink://&lt;Hostname&gt;:[portnumber] [/UID] [/PWD] [/READONLY] [/SVT] [/APPLICATION] [/FBS|FETCHBUFFERSIZE] [/ENCRYPTED] [/CHARSET] [/UNICODE] [/DLF] [/DATABASE] [/OPTIONS] [/DRIVER] <ul> <li><strong>Description of Parameters:</strong></li> <li> <strong>Hostname:</strong> Network Alias or IP address of the machine running the OpenLink Request Broker instance. </li> <li> <strong>Port Number:</strong> TCP port on which the Request Broker listens. </li> <li> <strong>/UID:</strong> Database username. </li> <li> <strong>/PWD:</strong> Database password. </li> <li> <strong>/READONLY:</strong> Read-write or read-only session mode. </li> <li> <strong>/SVT:</strong> A valid domain alias from the [Domain Aliases] section of the OpenLink server component's oplrqb.ini file. Default domain aliases represent the type of database agent to which the application intends to connect. </li> <li> <strong>/APPLICATION:</strong> The Application name to enable connectivity when restrictive server-side rules screen by application name. </li> <li> <strong>/FBS (or /FETCHBUFFERSIZE):</strong> The Fetch Buffer Size representing the number of rows to return during one fetch operation. </li> <li> <strong>/ENCRYPTED:</strong> Sets the Encrypted flag for outgoing packets. ('1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. Disabled by default.) </li> <li> <strong>/CHARSET:</strong> Specifies the charset of remote databases. Default value is read from System.getProperty("file.encoding"). </li> <li> <strong>/UNICODE:</strong> Instantiates unicode. The unicode connection isn't used by default. ('1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. Disabled by default.) </li> <li> <strong>/DLF:</strong> Pushes large, binary objects to the end of the resultset. Smaller data types are retrieved first, enhancing performance. ('1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. Disabled by default.) </li> <li> <strong>/DATABASE:</strong> Actual database name within a particular database environment. </li> <li> <strong>/OPTIONS:</strong> Optional parameter to pass specialized database native client connection parameters. </li> <li> <strong>/DRIVER:</strong> The Driver name contained in curly brackets ({}). Used for DSN-Less connections to remote ODBC Drivers. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li> <strong>Examples of Connection URLs:</strong> <ul> <li> jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=Ingres II/DATABASE=iidbdb/UID=ingres/PWD=ingres </li> <li> jdbc:openlink://192.128.13.119:5000/SVT=Oracle 8.1.x/DATABASE=ORCL/UID=scott/PWD=tiger </li> <li> jdbc:openlink://saturn:5000/SVT=Progress 91D/DATABASE=isports/OPTIONS=-S isports -N tcp -H saturn </li> <li> jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=SQLServer 2000/DATABASE=Northwind/UID=sa/OPTIONS=-S SATURN </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXMulti-TierGenericJDBCDriverConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on macOS</a></p>
Configuration of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on macOS
<ol> <li> To configure an ODBC DSN, perform the following steps: <ul> <li>Run the OpenLink iODBC Administrator located in the <code>/Applications/iODBC</code> folder.</li> <li>Click the <strong>Add</strong> button on the System DSN tab.</li> <li>Select the <strong>OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver</strong> from the list of available drivers.</li> <li>Select the Unicode version of the driver if and only if you are working with multi-byte character sets, as unnecessary translations can significantly affect ODBC performance.</li> <li>Provide a suitable DSN name and optional description for the Data Source.</li> <li>Click the "<strong>Manual settings...</strong>" link in the Server field and specify the host name and port on which the OpenLink Request Broker listens. Click <strong>OK</strong> to exit the host and port dialog.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to proceed.</li> </ul> </li> <li> The Connection tab takes the minimum parameters required to make a connection to the target database: <ul> <li><strong>Domain</strong> - The value must match a <em>[Domain Alias]</em>, which is contained in the Server's Session Rules Book.</li> <li><strong>Name</strong> - May take several settings, depending on the Domain (e.g., database name, JDBC driver classname, Oracle SID, etc.).</li> <li><strong>Server</strong> - This field passes DBMS-specific connection parameters. <a href="http://wikis.openlinksw.com/UdaWikiWeb/MTServerConfigConnectOptions">Review Complete Settings and Usage for Connect Options </a></li> <li>Review Complete Settings and Usage for Connect Options.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong> to proceed.</li> </ul> </li> <li> On the Connection tab, input the following: <ul> <li><strong>Username</strong> - A valid database uid.</li> <li><strong>Password</strong> - A valid database password.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong>.</li> </ul> </li> <li> The Options tab contains settings that are not required for a basic connection: <ul> <li><strong>Read Only connection</strong> - Specifies whether the connection is "Read-only." Make sure the checkbox is unchecked to request a "Read/Write" connection.</li> <li><strong>Defer fetching of long data</strong> - Defers fetching of LONG (BINARY, BLOB, etc.) data unless explicitly requested in a query.</li> <li><strong>Disable interactive login</strong> - Suppresses the ODBC "Username" and "Password" login dialog boxes when interacting with your ODBC DSN from within an ODBC compliant application.</li> <li><strong>Multiple Active Statements Emulation</strong> - Enables the use of Multiple Active statements in an ODBC application even if the underlying database does not allow this, as it is emulated in the driver.</li> <li><strong>Row Buffer Size</strong> - This attribute specifies the number of records to be transported over the network in a single network hop. Values can range from 1 to 99.</li> <li>Click <strong>Continue</strong>.</li> </ul> </li> <li> Click on the <strong>'Test Data Source</strong> button to make a connection to the database and verify Client-to-Broker connectivity. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXSampleAppUsageiODBCDemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on macOS
<ol> <li> The OpenLink installer should set your <strong>CLASSPATH</strong>. You should have a pre-existing <strong>JAVA_HOME</strong> directory that points to the root of your JAVA installation. No further configuration should be needed. </li> <li> <strong>Driver Name:</strong> <code>opljdbc3.jar, megathin3.jar</code> </li> <li> <strong>Driver Class Name:</strong> <code>openlink.jdbc3.Driver</code> </li> <li> <strong>Connection URL:</strong> <code>jdbc:openlink://&lt;Hostname&gt;:[portnumber] [/UID] [/PWD] [/READONLY] [/SVT] [/APPLICATION] [/FBS|FETCHBUFFERSIZE] [/ENCRYPTED] [/CHARSET] [/UNICODE] [/DLF] [/DATABASE] [/OPTIONS] [/DRIVER]</code> <ul> <li><strong>Hostname</strong> - Network Alias or IP address of the machine that runs an OpenLink Request Broker instance.</li> <li><strong>Port Number</strong> - TCP port on which the Request Broker listens.</li> <li><strong>/UID</strong> - Database username.</li> <li><strong>/PWD</strong> - Database password.</li> <li><strong>/READONLY</strong> - Read-write or read-only session mode.</li> <li><strong>/SVT</strong> - A valid domain alias from the [Domain Aliases] section of the OpenLink server component's oplrqb.ini file. Default domain aliases represent the type of database agent to which the application intends to connect, e.g., DB2, Informix 2000, Oracle 8.1.x. Custom aliases may take any form.</li> <li><strong>/APPLICATION</strong> - The Application name. Enables connectivity when restrictive server-side rules screen by application name.</li> <li><strong>/FBS</strong> (or <strong>/FETCHBUFFERSIZE</strong>) - The Fetch Buffer Size. The Fetch Buffer Size is an integer that represents the number of rows to return during one fetch operation.</li> <li><strong>/ENCRYPTED</strong> - Sets the Encrypted flag for outgoing packets. <code>/ENCRYPTED</code> may pass '1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. (This feature is disabled by default.)</li> <li><strong>/CHARSET</strong> - Specifies the charset of remote databases. The default value is read from <code>System.getProperty("file.encoding")</code>.</li> <li><strong>/UNICODE</strong> - Instantiates unicode. The unicode connection isn't used by default. The value may be '1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', 'n' (This feature is disabled by default.)</li> <li><strong>/DLF</strong> - Pushes large, binary objects to the end of the result set. Smaller data types are retrieved first. This enhances performance. <code>/DLF</code> may be set to '1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. (This feature is disabled by default.)</li> <li><strong>/DATABASE</strong> - Actual database name within a particular database environment.</li> <li><strong>/OPTIONS</strong> - Optional parameter that passes specialized database native client connection parameters. Do not use this parameter unless you need to pass Progress socket parameters or database native client parameters that enable a local OpenLink database agent to locate a remote database. Example parameters would be Oracle Net10 Service Names, Ingres vnodes, remote Informix instance names, or DB2 remote database aliases.</li> <li><strong>/DRIVER</strong> - The Driver name contained in curly brackets ({}). Used for DSN-Less connections to remote ODBC Drivers.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Examples of Connection URLs:</li> <ul> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=Ingres II/DATABASE=iidbdb/UID=ingres/PWD=ingres</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://192.128.13.119:5000/SVT=Oracle 8.1.x/DATABASE=ORCL/UID=scott/PWD=tiger</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://saturn:5000/SVT=Progress 91D/DATABASE=isports/OPTIONS=-S isports -N tcp -H saturn</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=SQLServer 2000/DATABASE=Northwind/UID=sa/OPTIONS=-S SATURN</code></li> </ul> </ol>
<p></p>
Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li> Log in to your Unix or Linux server machine, and create and/or navigate to the intended OpenLink installation directory, e.g., <pre><code>mkdir /opt/openlink cd /opt/openlink</code></pre> <ul> <li> <strong>Note:</strong> You can replace "/opt/openlink" with your desired installation path. </li> </ul> </li> <li> CD into the installation directory. <pre><code>cd /opt/openlink</code></pre> </li> <li> The installation files ship as an installation shell script, a driver .taz archive, and an optional administrator .taz file. <blockquote><code>Download these documents</code> using binary-preserving methods (e.g., ftp in BIN mode, or scp), and place them in your installation folder.</blockquote> </li> <li> Export your JAVA_HOME variable. It should pass the full path to your JAVA installation. <pre><code>export JAVA_HOME=/path/to/your/JAVA/installation</code></pre> <ul> <li> <strong>Note:</strong> Replace "/path/to/your/JAVA/installation" with the actual path to your Java installation directory. </li> <li> <strong>Note:</strong> Use the echo command to ensure that JAVA_HOME is set correctly. </li> </ul> </li> <li> Run the following command to start the installation: <pre><code>sh install.sh</code></pre> </li> <li> The installation is complete. </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxMulti-TierGenericJDBCDriverConfigurationGuide#this'>Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS</a></p>
Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li> Prerequisites <ul> <li> You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix shell. </li> <li> You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix editor such as vi. </li> <li> You <strong>MUST</strong> be in possession of relevant database connectivity details such as Database name, Username, password, etc. </li> <li> You <strong>MUST</strong> be aware of which Oracle client components have been configured for use by the Multi-tier server side components. </li> </ul> </li> <li> Log onto the machine and create a suitable OpenLink installation directory (<code>OPENLINK_INSTALL</code>). </li> <li> Copy all relevant components to <code>OPENLINK_INSTALL</code>. <p><strong>At bare minimum, these will be the OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver and OpenLink Http Administration Assistant.</strong></p> </li> <li> Install using the "<code>install.sh</code>" shell script: <pre><code>#sh install.sh</code></pre> The installation should finish without error. </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Server Components, on Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li> Log in to your Unix or Linux server machine, and Create and/or navigate to the intended OpenLink installation directory, e.g., <br> <code>mkdir /opt/openlink</code> <br> <code>cd /opt/openlink</code> <br> <br> <strong>Note:</strong> cd into the installation directory. </li> <li> The installation files ship as an installation shell script, a driver <code>.taz</code> archive, and an optional administrator <code>.taz</code> file. Download these documents using binary-preserving methods (e.g., ftp in BIN mode, or scp), and place them in your installation folder. </li> <li> Run the following command to start the installation: <br> <pre><code>sh install.sh</code></pre> <br> You must choose a TCP port at which the OpenLink Request Broker will listen for requests. The default is 5000. You will need to know this port number and the Broker host's IP address or hostname when configuring ODBC Data Source Names (DSNs). You must choose a TCP port at which the OpenLink Request Broker's HTTP-based Admin Assistant will listen for requests. The default is 8000. You will need to know this port number and the Broker host's IP address or hostname to access your Admistrator in a Web browser. The URL will look like this: <br> <code>http://broker-host.example.com:8000/</code> </li> <li> Additional Configuration Parameters: <ul> <li> <strong>Log file?</strong> enables you to specify the name and location of the OpenLink Request Broker's HTTP-based Admin Assistant's log file. It is best to go with the default. </li> <li> <strong>You can choose to log all requests</strong> made to the OpenLink Request Broker's HTTP-based Admin Assistant. This is not diagnostic-level ODBC tracing nor multi-tier connection logging. The default is no, and this is generally appropriate. </li> <li> <strong>You can change the OpenLink Request Broker's HTTP-based Admin Assistant's default username</strong> from "<code>admin</code>." This is the username you will use when working with the OpenLink Request Broker's HTTP-based Admin Assistant. (You can set up other usernames later; consider this one similar to "<code>root</code>.") </li> <li> <strong>You can change the OpenLink Request Broker's HTTP-based Admin Assistant's default password</strong> from "<code>admin</code>." This is the password associated with the username you just set. </li> </ul> The Installation is complete. </li> <li> Optionally, The domain section of the rulebook contains the Database Agent connection parameters for the outgoing connections towards your Oracle database. <br> Default Database Agent names for oracle use the following pattern: <br> <code>[generic_ora{{version}}]</code>. For Example, the Oracle 12 parameters are located in: <br> <code>[generic_ora12]</code>. <br> Locate your Database Agent, and uncomment the "<strong>Connect Options</strong>" parameter. <br> Add your hostname and port values using the following template: <br> <code>Connect Options = -H {{host}} -P {{port number}}</code>. <br> Configuration is complete. </li> <li> Installation is complete, proceed to making a test connection with your Client Component installation. </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client JDBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li> The OpenLink installer should set your <strong>CLASSPATH</strong>. You should have a pre-existing <strong>JAVA_HOME</strong> directory that points to the root of your JAVA installation. No further configuration should be needed. </li> <li> <strong>Driver Name:</strong> <code>opljdbc3.jar, megathin3.jar</code> </li> <li> <strong>Driver Class Name:</strong> <code>openlink.jdbc3.Driver</code> </li> <li> <strong>Connection URL:</strong> <code>jdbc:openlink://&lt;Hostname&gt;:[portnumber] [/UID] [/PWD] [/READONLY] [/SVT] [/APPLICATION] [/FBS|FETCHBUFFERSIZE] [/ENCRYPTED] [/CHARSET] [/UNICODE] [/DLF] [/DATABASE] [/OPTIONS] [/DRIVER]</code> <ul> <li><strong>Hostname</strong> - Network Alias or IP address of the machine that runs an OpenLink Request Broker instance.</li> <li><strong>Port Number</strong> - TCP port on which the Request Broker listens.</li> <li><strong>/UID</strong> - Database username.</li> <li><strong>/PWD</strong> - Database password.</li> <li><strong>/READONLY</strong> - Read-write or read-only session mode.</li> <li><strong>/SVT</strong> - A valid domain alias from the [Domain Aliases] section of the OpenLink server component's oplrqb.ini file. Default domain aliases represent the type of database agent to which the application intends to connect, e.g., DB2, Informix 2000, Oracle 8.1.x. Custom aliases may take any form.</li> <li><strong>/APPLICATION</strong> - The Application name. Enables connectivity when restrictive server-side rules screen by application name.</li> <li><strong>/FBS</strong> (or <strong>/FETCHBUFFERSIZE</strong>) - The Fetch Buffer Size. The Fetch Buffer Size is an integer that represents the number of rows to return during one fetch operation.</li> <li><strong>/ENCRYPTED</strong> - Sets the Encrypted flag for outgoing packets. <code>/ENCRYPTED</code> may pass '1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. (This feature is disabled by default.)</li> <li><strong>/CHARSET</strong> - Specifies the charset of remote databases. The default value is read from <code>System.getProperty("file.encoding")</code>.</li> <li><strong>/UNICODE</strong> - Instantiates unicode. The unicode connection isn't used by default. The value may be '1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', 'n' (This feature is disabled by default.)</li> <li><strong>/DLF</strong> - Pushes large, binary objects to the end of the result set. Smaller data types are retrieved first. This enhances performance. <code>/DLF</code> may be set to '1', '0', 'Y', 'N', 'y', or 'n'. (This feature is disabled by default.)</li> <li><strong>/DATABASE</strong> - Actual database name within a particular database environment.</li> <li><strong>/OPTIONS</strong> - Optional parameter that passes specialized database native client connection parameters. Do not use this parameter unless you need to pass Progress socket parameters or database native client parameters that enable a local OpenLink database agent to locate a remote database. Example parameters would be Oracle Net10 Service Names, Ingres vnodes, remote Informix instance names, or DB2 remote database aliases.</li> <li><strong>/DRIVER</strong> - The Driver name contained in curly brackets ({}). Used for DSN-Less connections to remote ODBC Drivers.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Examples of Connection URLs:</li> <ul> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=Ingres II/DATABASE=iidbdb/UID=ingres/PWD=ingres</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://192.128.13.119:5000/SVT=Oracle 8.1.x/DATABASE=ORCL/UID=scott/PWD=tiger</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://saturn:5000/SVT=Progress 91D/DATABASE=isports/OPTIONS=-S isports -N tcp -H saturn</code></li> <li><code>jdbc:openlink://localhost:5000/SVT=SQLServer 2000/DATABASE=Northwind/UID=sa/OPTIONS=-S SATURN</code></li> </ul> </ol>
<p></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (DB2)
<ol> <li>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as <code>vi</code>.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process—Sample DSN as created by installer:</li> <pre> [OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN </pre> <li><strong>Example DB2 Data Source</strong>:</li> <pre> [db2] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = DB2 Database = test Options = Username = db2inst1 Password = db2inst1 FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DB2 Connection </pre> <li>Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</li> <li>Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool, which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator, as follows:</li> <pre> # cd OPENLINK_INSTALL # . ./openlink.sh # iodbctest db2 iODBC Demonstration program This program shows an interactive SQL processor Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105 Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so) SQL>You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </pre> <li>Additional Information:</li> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit.</p> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Informix, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Informix DBMS instance and database:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Database Name</strong></li> <li><strong>Informix Instance Name</strong></li> <li><strong>Informix Instance Startup Mode (Sockets or Shared Memory).</strong> Note: Shared Memory connections with the Enterprise Edition require that the Request Broker and Database Agent be running on the Informix instance host. Sockets connections with the Enterprise Edition may be made with the Request Broker and Database Agent running on any host.</li> <li><strong>Informix Service Name</strong></li> <li><strong>Informix TCP Port Number</strong></li> <li><strong>Database Server Hostname or IP Address</strong></li> </ul> <li>The Multi-Tier server components must be installed on the same machine as an Informix native client, which may already be present as part of the Informix server installation. You can obtain the Informix Client SDK free of charge from the IBM Web site, and getting the latest version is recommended even if these components were already present.</li> <li>You must know whether the local Informix components are 32-bit or 64-bit.</li> <li>The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Informix components, not the OS.</li> <li>If you are installing the Multi-Tier server components on the same machine as an Informix native client (not Informix itself), the client must be configured to connect to the remote Informix DBMS.</li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are in use on the local Unix machine.</li> <ul> <li>These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant.</li> <li>If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to these services during installation.</li> </ul> <li>The local <code>/etc/services</code> file should include the Informix service definition; if not, the Informix socket service must be specified by port number, not name, in all our configuration, whether server-side or client-side.</li> <li>It is best to install your Multi-Tier server components using the UID of the local Informix or Informix native client owner.</li> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Informix, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Informix DBMS instance and database:</li> <ul> <li><strong>Database Name</strong></li> <li><strong>Informix Instance Name</strong></li> <li><strong>Informix Instance Startup Mode (Sockets or Shared Memory).</strong> Note: Shared Memory connections with the Enterprise Edition require that the Request Broker and Database Agent be running on the Informix instance host. Sockets connections with the Enterprise Edition may be made with the Request Broker and Database Agent running on any host.</li> <li><strong>Informix Service Name</strong></li> <li><strong>Informix TCP Port Number</strong></li> <li><strong>Database Server Hostname or IP Address</strong></li> </ul> <li>The Multi-Tier server components must be installed on the same machine as an Informix native client, which may already be present as part of the Informix server installation. You can obtain the Informix Client SDK free of charge from the IBM Web site, and getting the latest version is recommended even if these components were already present.</li> <li>You must know whether the local Informix components are 32-bit or 64-bit.</li> <li>The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Informix components, not the OS.</li> <li>If you are installing the Multi-Tier server components on the same machine as an Informix native client (not Informix itself), the client must be configured to connect to the remote Informix DBMS.</li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are in use on the local Unix machine.</li> <ul> <li>These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant.</li> <li>If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to these services during installation.</li> </ul> <li>The local <code>/etc/services</code> file should include the Informix service definition; if not, the Informix socket service must be specified by port number, not name, in all our configuration, whether server-side or client-side.</li> <li>It is best to install your Multi-Tier server components using the UID of the local Informix or Informix native client owner.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Server Components, on Linux or Unix-like OS</a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (Informix)
<ol> <li> <p>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi</p> <p>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process</p> <p>Sample DSN as created by installer:</p> <pre>[OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN</pre> </li> <li> <p>Example SQL Server 2000 Data Source-</p> <p>Example Informix 2000 Data Source-</p> <pre>[informix2000] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Informix 2000 Database = test Options = Username = informix Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Informix 2000 Connection</pre> </li> <li> <p>Example Informix 10 Data Source:</p> <pre>[informix10] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Informix 10 Database = test Options = Username = informix Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Informix 2000 Connection</pre> </li> <li> <p>Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</p> <p>Use the iodbctest tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows --</p> <pre>#cd OPENLINK_INSTALL #. ./openlink.sh # iodbctest informix2000</pre> <blockquote> <p>iODBC Demonstration program</p> <p>This program shows an interactive SQL processor</p> <p>Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105</p> <p>Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so)</p> <p>SQL>You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database.</p> </blockquote> </li> <li> <p>Additional Information</p> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit then the Generic ODBC Driver component MUST also be 32-bit.</p> </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Ingres, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Ingres DBMS instance and database:</li> <ul> <li><strong>The Ingres node name</strong></li> <li><strong>The Ingres listen address</strong></li> <li><strong>The Ingres database name</strong></li> </ul> <li>You must know whether the local Ingres components are 32-bit or 64-bit. The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Ingres components, not the OS.</li> <li>The Request Broker and database-specific Agents must be installed on the same machine as Ingres or an Ingres native client.</li> <ul> <li>If you install on the same machine as the Ingres native client, you must have a vnode configured.</li> </ul> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are already in use on the Broker host.</li> <ul> <li>These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> </ul> <li>For best results, the Multi-Tier server components should be installed while logged in as the local Ingres or Ingres native client owner.</li> <li>All Ingres-related environment variables should be set prior to installation. This is typically accomplished simply by logging in as the local Ingres or Ingres native client owner, but if logged in as a different user, you can often achieve the same by using that user's <code>.profile</code> or similar, with a command like one of these (depending on your active shell) --</li> <ul> <li><code>source ./.profile</code></li> <li><code>. ./.profile</code></li> </ul> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Ingres, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Ingres DBMS instance and database:</li> <ul> <li><strong>The Ingres node name</strong></li> <li><strong>The Ingres listen address</strong></li> <li><strong>The Ingres database name</strong></li> </ul> <li>You must know whether the local Ingres components are 32-bit or 64-bit. The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Ingres components, not the OS.</li> <li>The Request Broker and database-specific Agents must be installed on the same machine as Ingres or an Ingres native client.</li> <ul> <li>If you install on the same machine as the Ingres native client, you must have a vnode configured.</li> </ul> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are already in use on the Broker host.</li> <ul> <li>These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> </ul> <li>For best results, the Multi-Tier server components should be installed while logged in as the local Ingres or Ingres native client owner.</li> <li>All Ingres-related environment variables should be set prior to installation. This is typically accomplished simply by logging in as the local Ingres or Ingres native client owner, but if logged in as a different user, you can often achieve the same by using that user's <code>.profile</code> or similar, with a command like one of these (depending on your active shell) --</li> <ul> <li><code>source ./.profile</code></li> <li><code>. ./.profile</code></li> </ul> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Server Components, on Linux or Unix-like OS</a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (Ingres)
<ol> <li> <p>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi.</p> <ul> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process.</li> <p><strong>Sample DSN as created by installer:</strong></p> <pre><code>[OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN</code></pre> <p><strong>Example Ingres II Data Source:</strong></p> <pre><code>[ingres1] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Ingres II Database = test Options = Username = ingres Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Ingres II Connection</code></pre> <p><strong>Example Ingres II Data Source (utilizing a vNode):</strong></p> <pre><code>[ingres2] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Ingres II Database = vnode::database Options = Username = ingres Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Ingres II Connection</code></pre> </ul> </li> <li> <p>Assuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</p> <p>Use the iodbctest tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows:</p> <pre><code>#cd OPENLINK_INSTALL #. ./openlink.sh # iodbctest ingres1</code></pre> <blockquote> <p>iODBC Demonstration program</p> <p>This program shows an interactive SQL processor</p> <p>Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105</p> <p>Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so)</p> </blockquote> <p>SQL>You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database.</p> </li> </ol> <p><strong>Additional Information:</strong></p> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component MUST also be 32-bit.</p>
<p></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (MySQL)
<ol> <li>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as <code>vi</code>.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process—Sample DSN as created by installer:</li> <pre> [OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN </pre> <li>Example MySQL Data Source:</li> <pre> [mysql5] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = MySQL 5.x Database = test Options = -H mysql_hostname -P 3306 Username = root Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample MySQL 5.x Connection </pre> <li>Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</li> <li>Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool, which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator, as follows:</li> <pre> # cd OPENLINK_INSTALL # . ./openlink.sh # iodbctest mysql5 iODBC Demonstration program This program shows an interactive SQL processor Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105 Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so) SQL>You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </pre> <li>Additional Information</li> <li>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</li> <li>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component MUST also be 32-bit.</li> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Oracle, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Oracle DBMS instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>Oracle SID:</strong> Specify the Oracle System Identifier (SID) of your database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle TCP Port:</strong> Provide the TCP port number used for communication with the Oracle database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name:</strong> Specify the Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name if required. This is only necessary when the Multi-Tier server components are not installed on the Oracle server.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of Oracle database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Oracle database is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You will need an installation of the Oracle native client on a supported operating system if you cannot install the Multi-Tier server components on the same machine as Oracle itself. At the time of writing, this product may be called SQL*Net, Net 8, Net 9, Net 10, the Oracle Instant Client, or the OCI Client, depending on the Oracle version. Product names vary over time.</li> <li>You must know whether the local Oracle components are 32-bit or 64-bit. The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Oracle components, not the OS.</li> <li>The Request Broker and database-specific Agents must be installed on the same machine as Oracle or an Oracle native client.</li> <li>If you install on the same machine as Oracle SQL*Net or Net 8/9/10/11, you need an Oracle Net Service Name configured.</li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are already in use on the Broker host. These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> <li>For best results, the Multi-Tier server components should be installed while logged in as the local Oracle or Oracle native client owner.</li> <li>All Oracle-related environment variables should be set prior to installation. This is typically accomplished simply by logging in as the local Oracle or Oracle native client owner, but if logged in as a different user, you can often achieve the same by using that user's .profile or similar, with a command like one of these (depending on your active shell): <ul> <li><code>source ./.profile</code></li> <li><code>. ./.profile</code></li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Oracle, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Oracle DBMS instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>Oracle SID:</strong> Specify the Oracle System Identifier (SID) of your database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle TCP Port:</strong> Provide the TCP port number used for communication with the Oracle database.</li> <li><strong>Oracle SQL*Net or Net Service Name:</strong> Only required when the Multi-Tier server components are not installed on the Oracle server.</li> <li><strong>Hostname or IP address of Oracle database server:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Oracle database is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You will need an installation of the Oracle native client on a supported operating system if you cannot install the Multi-Tier server components on the same machine as Oracle itself. At the time of writing, this product may be called SQL*Net, Net 8, Net 9, Net 10, the Oracle Instant Client, or the OCI Client, depending on the Oracle version. Product names vary over time. You must know whether the local Oracle components are 32-bit or 64-bit. The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Oracle components, not the operating system.</li> <li>The Request Broker and database-specific Agents must be installed on the same machine as Oracle or an Oracle native client. If you install on the same machine as Oracle SQL*Net or Net 8/9/10/11, you need an Oracle Net Service Name configured. You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are already in use on the Broker host. These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> <li>For best results, the Multi-Tier server components should be installed while logged in as the local Oracle or Oracle native client owner.</li> <li>All Oracle-related environment variables should be set prior to installation. This is typically accomplished simply by logging in as the local Oracle or Oracle native client owner, but if logged in as a different user, you can often achieve the same by using that user's .profile or similar, with a command like one of these (depending on your active shell): <ul> <li><code>source ./.profile</code></li> <li><code>. ./.profile</code></li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Server Components, on Linux or Unix-like OS</a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (Oracle)
<ol> <li>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as <code>vi</code>.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process. This is the sample DSN as created by the installer:</li> </ol> <pre><code>[OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN</code></pre> <ul> <li>Example Oracle 9.x (Full Client) Data Source:</li> </ul> <pre><code>[oracle9] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Oracle 9.x Options = TNSNAME Username = oracle Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Oracle 9.x (Full Client) Connection</code></pre> <ul> <li>Example Oracle 10.x (Full Client) Data Source:</li> </ul> <pre><code>[oracle10] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Oracle 10.x Options = TNSNAME Username = oracle Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Oracle 10.x (Full Client) Connection</code></pre> <ul> <li>Example Oracle 10.x (Instant Client) Data Source:</li> </ul> <pre><code>[oracle10] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Oracle 10.x Options = //oracle_hostname:port/TNSNAME Username = oracle Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Oracle 10.x (Instant Client) Connection</code></pre> <p>Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection. Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows:</p> <pre><code># cd OPENLINK_INSTALL # . ./openlink.sh # iodbctest oracle10</code></pre> <pre> <blockquote> <i>iODBC Demonstration program This program shows an interactive SQL processor Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105 Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so)</i> </blockquote> </pre> <p>SQL>You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database.</p> <p>Additional Information:</p> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component MUST also be 32-bit.</p> </ol>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Progress/OpenEdge 9.x, 10.x, and later (SQL-92), for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Progress/OpenEdge DBMS instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>The SQL Engine Capabilities at Startup (4GL, SQL, or Both):</strong> <ul> <li>Progress 8.x and earlier only support 4GL, also referred to as SQL-89 mode. Our SQL-92 Agents cannot be used with Progress 8.x or earlier.</li> <li>Progress 9.x has a hybrid engine and supports both 4GL and SQL by default, but may be restricted to either at launch. Check the Progress 9.x log file to see what your engine is doing. The Progress instance must be running with SQL support for SQL-92 connections.</li> <li>Progress OpenEdge 10.x and later only support SQL, also referred to as SQL-92 mode. Our SQL-89 Agents cannot be used with Progress OpenEdge 10.x or later.</li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>The Startup Mode (Sockets or Shared Memory):</strong> The Progress instance must be running in sockets mode to support SQL-92 connections.</li> <li><strong>Your Progress database server's TCP socket service name and/or port number:</strong> Specify the TCP socket service name and/or port number used by your Progress database server.</li> <li><strong>Your Progress database server's hostname or IP address:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Progress database is located.</li> <li><strong>Whether your database queries fire 4GL triggers:</strong> Determine whether your database queries trigger 4GL events.</li> <li><strong>Whether your database queries involve Array fields:</strong> Identify if your database queries involve Array fields.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Recommended and optimal deployment has the Multi-Tier server components installed on the same machine as Progress itself, and there are no other software requirements.</li> <li>If you cannot install the Multi-Tier server components on the Progress host, they must be installed on the same host as a Progress native client.</li> <li>At the time of writing, the SQL-92 Progress native client is called <strong>Progress® SQL-92 Client Access</strong>. Product names may vary over time. You must know whether the local Progress components are 32-bit or 64-bit. The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Progress components, not the OS.</li> <li>If you are installing on a machine with <strong>Progress® SQL-92 Client Access</strong> (not Progress itself), the Progress Client must be configured to connect to the remote Progress DBMS.</li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports <strong>5000</strong> and <strong>8000</strong> are already in use on the Broker host. These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> <li>The local <code>/etc/services</code> file should include the Progress service definition; if not, the Progress socket service must be specified by port number, not name, in all our configuration, whether server-side or client-side.</li> <li>For best results, the Multi-Tier server components should be installed while logged in as the local Progress or Progress native client owner.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Database Agents, on Windows</a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Progress/OpenEdge 9.x, 10.x, and later (SQL-92), Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Progress/OpenEdge DBMS instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>The SQL Engine Capabilities at Startup (4GL, SQL, or Both):</strong> <ul> <li>Progress 8.x and earlier only support 4GL, also referred to as SQL-89 mode. Our SQL-92 Agents cannot be used with Progress 8.x or earlier.</li> <li>Progress 9.x has a hybrid engine and supports both 4GL and SQL by default, but may be restricted to either at launch. Check the Progress 9.x log file to see what your engine is doing. The Progress instance must be running with SQL support for SQL-92 connections.</li> <li>Progress OpenEdge 10.x and later only support SQL, also referred to as SQL-92 mode. Our SQL-89 Agents cannot be used with Progress OpenEdge 10.x or later.</li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>The Startup Mode (Sockets or Shared Memory):</strong> The Progress instance must be running in sockets mode to support SQL-92 connections.</li> <li><strong>Your Progress database server's TCP socket service name and/or port number:</strong> Specify the TCP socket service name and/or port number used by your Progress database server.</li> <li><strong>Your Progress database server's hostname or IP address:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Progress database is located.</li> <li><strong>Whether your database queries fire 4GL triggers:</strong> Determine whether your database queries trigger 4GL events.</li> <li><strong>Whether your database queries involve Array fields:</strong> Identify if your database queries involve Array fields.</li> </ul> </li> <li>Recommended and optimal deployment has the Multi-Tier server components installed on the same machine as Progress itself, and there are no other software requirements.</li> <li>If you cannot install the Multi-Tier server components on the Progress host, they must be installed on the same host as a Progress native client.</li> <li>At the time of writing, the SQL-92 Progress native client is called Progress® SQL-92 Client Access. Product names may vary over time. You must know whether the local Progress components are 32-bit or 64-bit. The Multi-Tier server components must match the bit format of the local Progress components, not the OS.</li> <li>If you are installing on a machine with Progress® SQL-92 Client Access (not Progress itself), the Progress Client must be configured to connect to the remote Progress DBMS.</li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are already in use on the Broker host. These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> <li>The local <code>/etc/services</code> file should include the Progress service definition; if not, the Progress socket service must be specified by port number, not name, in all our configuration, whether server-side or client-side.</li> <li>For best results, the Multi-Tier server components should be installed while logged in as the local Progress or Progress native client owner.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Server Components, on Linux or Unix-like OS</a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (Progress)
<ol> <li>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process. Here is the sample DSN as created by the installer:</li> </ol> <pre> [OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN </pre> <p>Example Progress SQL-89/4GL Data Source:</p> <pre> [progress100sql89] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Progress 100A Database = /dbs/progress/wrk10b/sports2000.db Options = -H hostname -S servicename -N tcp Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Progress SQL-89 Connection </pre> <p>Example Progress SQL-92 Data Source:</p> <pre> [progress100sql92] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Progress 100SQL Database = /dbs/progress/wrk10b/sports2000.db Options = -H hostname -S servicename -N tcp Username = sysprogress Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Progress SQL-92 Connection </pre> <p><strong>NOTE:</strong> The "<code>-H hostname -S servicename -N tcp</code>" parameters represent a socket-based connection to the database. Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</p> <p>Use the iodbctest tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows:</p> <pre> # cd OPENLINK_INSTALL # . ./openlink.sh # iodbctest progress100sql92 </pre> <p><strong>iODBC Demonstration program</strong></p> <p>This program shows an interactive SQL processor</p> <p><strong>Driver Manager:</strong> 03.52.0507.0105</p> <p><strong>Driver:</strong> 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so)</p> <p><strong>SQL></strong> You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database.</p> <p><strong>Additional Information</strong></p> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit.</p>
<p></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Microsoft SQL Server, for Windows
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Microsoft SQL Server DBMS instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server instance name:</strong> Specify the name of your SQL Server instance.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server listen port:</strong> Provide the listening port used by your SQL Server.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database name:</strong> Specify the name of the target database you want to connect to.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database server hostname or IP address:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your SQL Server is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports 5000 and 8000 are already in use on the Broker host. These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Enterprise Edition (Multi-Tier) Database Agents, on Windows</a></p>
Pre-Installation Requirements for the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Request Broker and Database Agent(s) for Microsoft SQL Server, Linux or Unix-like OS
<ol> <li>You need to know a variety of information pertaining to your target Microsoft SQL Server DBMS instance and database: <ul> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server instance name:</strong> Specify the name of your Microsoft SQL Server instance.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server listen port:</strong> Provide the listen port used by your Microsoft SQL Server.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database name:</strong> Specify the name of your Microsoft SQL Server database.</li> <li><strong>Microsoft SQL Server database server hostname or IP address:</strong> Provide the hostname or IP address of the server where your Microsoft SQL Server database is located.</li> </ul> </li> <li>You must know whether TCP ports <strong>5000</strong> and <strong>8000</strong> are already in use on the Broker host. These ports are the defaults used by our Request Broker and Web-based Admin Assistant. If other services are using these, you will need to assign different (unused) ports to the new services during installation.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/GenericLinuxMulti-TierRequestBrokerInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Server Components, on Linux or Unix-like OS</a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (SQL Server)
<ol> <li>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process.</li> </ol> <pre> Sample DSN as created by installer: [OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN </pre> <p>Example SQL Server 2000 Data Source:</p> <pre> [sqlserver2000] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = SQLServer 2000 Database = test Options = -H sqlserver_hostname -P 1433 Username = sa Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample SQL Server 2000 Connection </pre> <p>Example SQL Server 2005 Data Source:</p> <pre> [sqlserver2005] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = SQLServer 2005 Database = test Options = -H sqlserver_hostname -P 1433 Username = sa Password = ********** FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample SQL Server 2000 Connection </pre> <p>Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</p> <p>Use the iodbctest tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows:</p> <pre> # cd OPENLINK_INSTALL # . ./openlink.sh # iodbctest sqlserver2000 </pre> <p><strong>iODBC Demonstration program</strong></p> <p>This program shows an interactive SQL processor</p> <p><strong>Driver Manager:</strong> 03.52.0507.0105</p> <p><strong>Driver:</strong> 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so)</p> <p><strong>SQL></strong> You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database.</p> <p><strong>Additional Information</strong></p> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit.</p>
<p></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier "Enterprise" Edition Generic Client ODBC Drivers, on Linux or Unix-like OS (Sybase)
<ol> <li>Open the file <code>$OPENLINK_INSTALL/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as <code>vi</code>.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[OpenLink]</strong> section, which is a sample OpenLink Generic ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process—Sample DSN as created by installer:</li> <pre> [OpenLink] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = localhost:5000 ServerType = Oracle 8.1.x Database = Options = Username = Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample DSN </pre> <li><strong>Example Sybase 12 Data Source</strong>:</li> <pre> [sybase12] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Sybase 12 Database = test Options = -H sybase_hostname -P 4500 Username = sa Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Sybase 12 Connection </pre> <li><strong>Sample Sybase 15 Data Source</strong>:</li> <pre> [sybase15] Driver = /OPENLINK_INSTALL/lib/oplodbc.so Host = requestbroker_hostname:5000 ServerType = Sybase 15 Database = test Options = -H sybase_hostname -P 4500 Username = sa Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample Sybase 15 Connection </pre> <li>Presuming the OpenLink Request Broker is already running on the target machine, you are now ready to test the connection.</li> <li>Use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool, which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator, as follows:</li> <pre> # cd OPENLINK_INSTALL # . ./openlink.sh # iodbctest sybase15 iODBC Demonstration program This program shows an interactive SQL processor Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105 Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (oplodbc.so) SQL>You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </pre> <li>Additional Information:</li> <p>The bitness of the Generic ODBC Driver is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.</p> <p>That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit, then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit.</p> </ol>
<p></p>
Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo
<ol> <li> <p>C++ Demo is a simple ODBC-based Interactive SQL processor written, as may be obvious from its name, in C++. The binary executable may be found at:</p> <pre><code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALLATION_DIRECTORY&gt;\samples\odbc</code></pre> <p>As with other sample applications we ship, when source code is available, it may be found alongside the executable.</p> </li> <li> <p>Be sure to launch the tool appropriate to the Driver and DSN you are testing:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Driver/DSN:</strong> Windows - 64-bit <br> <strong>Default location:</strong> C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\Samples\Odbc\cppdemo.exe </li> <li> <strong>Driver/DSN:</strong> 32-bit Windows - 64-bit <br> <strong>Default location:</strong> C:\Program Files (x86)\OpenLink Software\UDA\Samples\Odbc\cppdemo.exe </li> <li> <strong>Driver/DSN:</strong> 32-bit Windows - 32-bit <br> <strong>Default location:</strong> C:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\Samples\Odbc\cppdemo.exe </li> </ul> </li> <li> <p>Once the app has launched, select menu item <strong>Environment</strong> &gt;&gt; <strong>Open Connection</strong>. The ODBC Driver Manager will present a list of available ODBC DSNs. Select the DSN to which you wish to connect ("Informix 7 on Local" has been selected, below).</p> <p>You will be presented with a Login Dialog. Enter the user name and password for the target database, and click <strong>Connect</strong>.</p> </li> <li> <p>You should now be connected to the chosen data source. Use the <strong>SQL</strong> &gt;&gt; <strong>Execute SQL</strong> menu item to get the SQL input dialog. Enter any valid SQL statement (see example in the screenshot), and click <strong>OK</strong>.</p> </li> <li> <p>You will be presented with the results of your query. Close the connection by selecting the <strong>Environment</strong> &gt;&gt; <strong>Close Connection</strong> menu item. Exiting the application through any normal Windows pattern will also close the connection.</p> </li> </ol>
<p></p>
Testing ODBC DSNs on macOS, with iODBC Demo
<ol> <li>Locate the <code>iODBC Demo Ansi.app</code> or <code>iODBC Demo Unicode.app</code> (found in <code>/Applications/iODBC/</code>), and launch by double-clicking its icon.</li> <li>From the <strong>Environment</strong> menu, select <strong>Open Connection…</strong>, and select your new MySQL DSN.</li> <li>Input your MySQL username and password, and click <strong>Connect</strong>.</li> <li>From the <strong>SQL</strong> menu, select <strong>Execute SQL…</strong>, and type in a SQL query, appropriate to your database. By default, the result set is capped at 1000 rows; you may want to set this smaller for your own test.</li> <li>View your query results.</li> </ol>
<p></p>
OpenLink ODBC Driver Installation for Linux
<ol> <li> The installation files ship as an installation shell script, a driver and admin <code>.taz</code> file, and a license <code>.lic</code> file. The installation shell script should be ftp'd in ascii. The rest of the files should be ftp'd in binary, where applicable. </li> <li> Downloads these documents, and place them in your desired installation folder. </li> <li> Start the installation process by opening the installation directory using <code>cd</code>, and running <code>sh install.sh</code>. </li> <li> You must choose a TCP port on which to run your HTTP-based iODBC Data Sources Administrator. The default is 8000. You will need to know this port number and your local machine's IP address or hostname to access your Admistrator in a Web browser. This is how you call it: <code>http://machine:portnumber</code> </li> <li> <strong>Log File?</strong> enables you to rename and relocate your Administrative Assistant's log file. It is best to go with the default. </li> <li> You can choose to log all requests. This is not diagnostic-level odbc tracing or connection logging. The default is no. </li> <li> You can change the iODBC Data Source Administrator's default username from "<code>admin</code>." This is the name that you will need to login to OpenLink's HTTP-based iODBC Data Sources Administrator. </li> <li> You can change the iODBC Data Source Administrator's default password from "<code>admin</code>." </li> <li> The installation is complete. </li> </ol>
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Configuration of the Multi-Tier Informix Database Agent, for Windows
<ol> <li> <p>Informix requires a small amount of additional environmental configuration in the OpenLink Request Broker session rule book (<code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code>)</p> <ul> <li> <p>Open the file <code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code> with a suitable text editor, such as Wordpad.</p> </li> <li> <p>Locate and edit the <strong>[Environment xxxxx]</strong> section (where xxxxx matches your target database), and ensure that any relevant environment variables pertaining to your system and target database are correct.</p> <p>NOTE: You may need to consult with your database administrator to verify these. The following example depicts an environment section for Informix --</p> <pre>[Environment INFORMIX2000] INFORMIXSERVER = your_informix_server INFORMIXDIR = C:\Program Files\IBM\Informix\Client-SDK DELIMIDENT = Y ; Allow quoted identifiers OPL_INF_MULTISESS = Y ; Allow multiple sessions OPL_SPACEPADCHAR = Y ; Pad CHAR fields with spaces CURSOR_SENSITIVITY = LOW ; Set to HIGH after loading oplrvc.sql ;FET_BUF_SIZE = 65535 ; Size of the fetch buffer ;FORCE_ONLINE_DATABASE = 1 ; Force mode to (0) SE or (1) ONLINE ;CLIENT_LOCALE = EN_US.UTF8 ; Uncomment and adjust when Client and Server locale settings differ Path = C:\Program Files\IBM\Informix\Client-SDK\bin ; Find shared libraries</pre> </li> </ul> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier Informix Database Agent, for Generic Linux
<ol> <li> <p>Database Agent modifications are made using the Request Broker's Rulebook (<code>oplrqb.ini</code>).</p> <p>This is located at <code>{{Server Components Installation}}/bin/oplrqb.ini</code></p> </li> <li> <p>Open this document using your preferred text editor (e.g., vim, vi)</p> <p>Informix Environments are Denoted by "<strong>Environment INFORMIX{Version}</strong>".</p> </li> <li> <p>Locate the Informix environment, and confirm that the required values are in place</p> <p>[Environment INFORMIX2000]</p> <p><strong>INFORMIXSERVER</strong> = [Informix Server Name]</p> <p><strong>INFORMIXDIR</strong> = {Informix installation directory}</p> <p>Save these changes and exit the file.</p> </li> <li> <p>Run "<code>oplrqb stop</code>" to stop the request broker</p> <p>Run "<code>oplrqb start</code>" to start the request broker with your new rulebook settings</p> </li> </ol>
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Configuration of the Multi-Tier Ingres Database Agent, for Windows
<ol> <li> <p>Open the file <code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code> with a suitable text editor, such as Wordpad.</p> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[Environment xxxxx]</strong> section (where xxxxx matches your target database).</li> <li>Ensure that any relevant environment variables pertaining to your system and target database are correct.</li> <p><strong>NOTE:</strong> You may need to consult with your database administrator to verify these.</p> <p><strong>Example environment section for Ingres:</strong></p> <pre><code>[Environment INGRES_II] II_DATE_FORMAT = US II_SYSTEM = C:\Program Files\Ingres ING_SET = set lockmode session where readlock=nolock CURSOR_SENSITIVITY = LOW ; Set to HIGH after loading oplrvc.sql Path =</code></pre> </li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier Ingres Database Agent, for Generic Linux
<ol> <li> <p>Database Agent modifications are made using the Request Broker's Rulebook (<code>oplrqb.ini</code>).</p> <p>This is located at <code>{{Server Components Installation}}/bin/oplrqb.ini</code></p> <ul> <li> <p>Open this document using your preferred text editor (e.g., vim, vi).</p> </li> </ul> </li> <li> <p>Ingres Environments are Denoted by "<strong>Environment INFORMIX{Version}</strong>".</p> <ul> <li> <p>Locate the Informix environment and confirm that the required values are in place.</p> <pre>[Environment INGRES_II] II_DATE_FORMAT = US II_SYSTEM = /dbs</pre> </li> </ul> </li> <li> <p>Save these changes and exit the file.</p> </li> <li> <p>Run "<code>oplrqb stop</code>" to stop the request broker.</p> </li> <li> <p>Run "<code>oplrqb start</code>" to start the request broker with your new rulebook settings.</p> </li> </ol>
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Pre-Install Guide for Lite Edition ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (ODBC-JDBC Bridge) on macOS
<ol> <li>You must have a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) that is compatible with the Single-Tier (Lite Edition) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources.</li> <ul> <li>Generally, the latest JVM from <a href="http://java.com/">http://java.com/</a> is the best choice.</li> <li>If using a 64-bit ODBC Driver, you must have a 64-bit JVM.</li> </ul> <li>You must possess third-party or native JDBC drivers that connect to your target database.</li> <li>If your 3rd party JDBC Driver connection attempt isn't successful, check that the JDBC driver jar file (or a symbolic link to it) is included in the active <code>$CLASSPATH</code>.</li> <li>Note, supporting Java libraries (or links to them) may also need to be referenced by this variable value.</li> <li>Finally, directories containing other supporting libraries may need to be referenced by other shared library environment variables (e.g., <code>LD_LIBRARY_PATH</code>, <code>LIBPATH</code>, <code>SHLIB_PATH</code>).</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/MacOSXLiteJDBCInstallationGuide#this'>Installation of the Lite Edition (Single-Tier) ODBC Driver for JDBC Data Sources (a/k/a ODBC-to-JDBC Bridge), for macOS </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier Oracle Database Agent, for Windows
<ol> <li>Oracle requires a small amount of additional environmental configuration in the OpenLink Request Broker session rule book (<code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code>).</li> <li>Edit the file <code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as Wordpad.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[Environment xxxxx]</strong> section where <strong>xxxxx</strong> matches your target database to ensure that any relevant environment variables pertaining to your system and target database are correct. You may need to consult with your database administrator to verify these.</li> <li>The following examples depict the environment sections for Oracle:</li> </ol> <p>Oracle 9 (Full Client)</p> <pre><code>[Environment ORACLE9] ORACLE_HOME = D:\oracle\product\9.2.1\Db_1 ;ORACLE_SID = ORCL ;ORACLE_SERVER = T ;TWO_TASK = P: ;ODBC_CATALOGS = Y ; Uncomment after loading odbccat9.sql ;MULTIPLEX_LDA = 5 ; Allow 5 OpenLink clients on a single lda ;OPL_USR_TBLS_FIRST=Y ; Sort SQLTables starting with user tables</code></pre> <p>Oracle 10 (Full Client)</p> <pre><code>[Environment ORACLE10] ORACLE_HOME = D:\oracle\product\10.1.0\Db_1 ;ORACLE_SID = ORCL ;ORACLE_SERVER = T ;TWO_TASK = P: ;ODBC_CATALOGS = Y ; Uncomment after loading odbccat9.sql ;MULTIPLEX_LDA = 5 ; Allow 5 OpenLink clients on a single lda ;OPL_USR_TBLS_FIRST=Y ; Sort SQLTables starting with user tables ;OCI_CONNPOOL_MIN = 0 ; if not set defaults to 0 ;OCI_CONNPOOL_MAX = 0 ; if not set defaults to OCI_CONNPOOL_MIN ;OCI_CONNPOOL_INCR = 1 ; if not set defaults to 1 ;OCI_CONNPOOL_WAIT = TRUE ; if not set defaults to TRUE</code></pre> <p>Oracle 10 (Instant Client)</p> <pre><code>[Environment ORACLE10] ORACLE_HOME = C:\Instant_client_10_2 ;ORACLE_SID = ORCL ;ORACLE_SERVER = T ;TWO_TASK = P: ;ODBC_CATALOGS = Y ; Uncomment after loading odbccat9.sql ;MULTIPLEX_LDA = 5 ; Allow 5 OpenLink clients on a single lda ;OPL_USR_TBLS_FIRST=Y ; Sort SQLTables starting with user tables ;OCI_CONNPOOL_MIN = 0 ; if not set defaults to 0 ;OCI_CONNPOOL_MAX = 0 ; if not set defaults to OCI_CONNPOOL_MIN ;OCI_CONNPOOL_INCR = 1 ; if not set defaults to 1 ;OCI_CONNPOOL_WAIT = TRUE ; if not set defaults to TRUE</code></pre> <p>Make sure to save the changes after editing the <code>oplrqb.ini</code> file.</p>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier Oracle Database Agent, for Generic Linux
<ol> <li> Database Agent modifications are made using the Request Broker's Rulebook (<code>oplrqb.ini</code>). <ul> <li>Open this document using your preferred text editor (e.g., <code>vim</code>, <code>vi</code>).</li> </ul> </li> <li> Oracle Environments are denoted by "<strong>Environment Oracle</strong>", followed by a version number. For example: <pre><code>[Environment Oracle6]</code></pre> <ul> <li>Locate your environment, and confirm that the <strong>ORACLE_HOME</strong> and <strong>ORACLE_SID</strong> values are correct.</li> <li>For example: <pre><code>[Environment ORACLE180] ORACLE_HOME = {Oracle-Installation-Home-Directory} ORACLE_SID = {Oracle-System-ID}</code></pre> </li> <li>Save these changes and exit the file.</li> </ul> </li> <li> Run "<code>oplrqb stop</code>" to stop the request broker. </li> <li> Run "<code>oplrqb start</code>" to start the request broker with your new rulebook settings. </li> </ol>
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OpenLink ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL (Lite Edition) Configuration
<ol> <li> Prerequisites: <ul> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix shell.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be proficient in using a Unix editor such as vi.</li> <li>You <strong>MUST</strong> be in possession of relevant database connectivity details such as Database name, Username, password, etc.</li> </ul> </li> <li> Open the file <code>&lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/bin/odbc.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as vi. </li> <li> Locate and edit the sample OpenLink PostgreSQL ODBC data source (DSN) created during the installation process and edit as follows: <pre> [postgres] Driver = &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt;/lib/pgr7_mt_lt.so ServerType = PostgreSQL Options = -H postgres.hostname Database = database Username = postgres Password = FetchBufferSize = 99 ReadOnly = no DeferLongFetch = no JetFix = no Description = Sample PostgreSQL Lite Connection </pre> </li> <li> To test your data source, use the <code>iodbctest</code> tool which is packaged with the HTTP-based OpenLink ODBC Administrator as follows: <pre> # cd &lt;OPENLINK_INSTALL&gt; # . ./openLink.sh # iodbctest postgres </pre> <blockquote> iODBC Demonstration program<br> This program shows an interactive SQL processor<br> Driver Manager: 03.52.0507.0105<br> Driver: 06.02.1217 OpenLink Generic ODBC Driver (pgr7_mt_lt.so)<br> <br> SQL&gt; </blockquote> </li> <li> You should now be able to issue SQL statements directly against the target database. </li> </ol> <p> Additional Notes:<br> The bitness of the ODBC Driver for PostgreSQL is determined by the bitness of your ODBC client application.<br> That is, if your ODBC client application is 32-bit then the Generic ODBC Driver component <strong>MUST</strong> also be 32-bit. </p>
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Configuration of the Multi-Tier Progress Database Agent, for Windows
<ol> <li>Progress requires a small amount of additional environmental configuration in the OpenLink Request Broker session rule book (<code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code>).</li> <li>Edit the file <code>c:\Program Files\OpenLink Software\UDA\bin\oplrqb.ini</code> with a suitable text editor such as Wordpad.</li> <li>Locate and edit the <strong>[Environment xxxxx]</strong> section where xxxxx matches your target database to ensure that any relevant environment variables pertaining to your system and target database are correct. Note that you may need to consult with your database administrator to verify these settings.</li> </ol> <p>The following examples depict the environment section for Progress:</p> <p>Progress (SQL-89)</p> <pre> [Environment PROGRESS91C] DLC = D:\Program Files\Progress\10.1B Path = D:\Program Files\Progress\10.1B\BIN;C:\WINNT\System32 ;TABLEVIEW = ;TABLEVIEW_QUALIFIER = Y ;DEADLOCK_TIMEOUT = 60 ; Seconds to wait for lock to release ;INSERT_LOGICAL = Y ;UPDATE_LOGICAL = Y ;MIN_FIELD_LEN = ;MAX_FIELD_LEN = CURSOR_SENSITIVITY = LOW ; Set to HIGH after loading oplrvc.sql </pre> <p>Progress (SQL-92)</p> <pre> [Environment PROGRESS91SQL] DLC = D:\Program Files\Progress\10.1B Path = D:\Program Files\Progress\10.1B\BIN;C:\WINNT\system32 CURSOR_SENSITIVITY = LOW ; Set to HIGH after loading oplrvc.sql </pre>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier Progress Database Agent, for Generic Linux
<ol> <li>Database Agent modifications are made using the Request Broker's Rulebook (<code>oplrqb.ini</code>).</li> <li>This is located at <strong>{{Server Components Installation}}/bin/oplrqb.ini</strong>.</li> <li>Open this document using your preferred text editor (e.g., <code>vim</code>, <code>vi</code>).</li> <li>Progress Environments are denoted by "<strong>Environment Progress{Version}</strong>".</li> <li>Locate the Progress environment and confirm that the required values are in place:</li> </ol> <pre><code>[Environment PROGRESS110SQL] DLC = {Full path to the Progress dlc directory} PROCFG = {Full path and filename to the progress.cfg file}</code></pre> <p>Save these changes and exit the file.</p> <p>Run "<strong>oplrqb stop</strong>" to stop the request broker.</p> <p>Run "<strong>oplrqb start</strong>" to start the request broker with your new rulebook settings.</p>
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Configuration of the Multi-Tier SQL Server Database Agent, for Windows
<ol> <li>SQL Server needs no additional configuration.</li> </ol>
<p>Next Guide: <a href='http://data.openlinksw.com/oplweb/uda/howto/WindowsSampleAppUsageC++DemoUsageGuide#this'>Testing ODBC DSNs on Windows, with C++ Demo </a></p>
Configuration of the Multi-Tier SQL Server Database Agent, for Generic Linux
<ol> <li>Database Agent modifications are made using the Request Broker's Rulebook (<code>oplrqb.ini</code>). This is located at <strong>{{Server Components Installation}}/bin/oplrqb.ini</strong>. Open this document using your preferred text editor (e.g., vim, vi).</li> <li>SQL Server Environments are denoted by "<strong>Environment {{Database}}</strong>", followed by a version number.</li> <li>Locate the SQL Server environment and confirm that the required values are in place.</li> </ol> <p>Example:</p> <pre> [Environment SQLSERVER] FREETDSCONF = /home/openlink/bin/freetds.conf DSQUERY = SQLSERVER ; Load this section from freetds.conf TDSHOST = host.domain ; Point this to your SQLServer machine TDSPORT = 1433 TDSVER = 8.0 CURSOR_SENSITIVITY = LOW ; Set to HIGH after loading oplrvc.sql </pre> <p>Save these changes and exit the file.</p> <p>Run "<code>oplrqb stop</code>" to stop the request broker.</p> <p>Run "<code>oplrqb start</code>" to start the request broker with your new rulebook settings.</p>
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